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Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning

Practice Management: Leadership Imaging Pearls - Educational Tools | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ Practice Management ❯ Leadership

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  • “So what is on the forefront of technological advancement for the home consumer? Health and wellness. The current paradigm of health care delivery is akin to driving a car on a given day and looking at the dash- board information, which is then blacked out for the rest of the year. A once-a-year physical examination with parameters from a single time point is very similar and leaves you with only a brief snapshot of a person’s health. In the future, your smart home will serve as a 24-hour health monitor. The home thermostat will sense changes in your temperature, lights will monitor your movement, and toilets will test for early cancers via urine or stool samples.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    J Am Coll Radiol 2020 Aug;17(8):1071-1072
  • “As 5G networks facilitate streaming of large volumes of data without latency, home health and wellness monitors will create a paradigm shift in disease diagnosis and management. The relative effectiveness of early disease diagnosis and monitoring made possible by annual visits or even more frequent regular visits to a physician’s office pales in comparison with the potential to improve health and wellness that constant monitoring by smart devices will provide. Determining how to accurately and efficiently analyze these massive data represents the next big implementation hurdle.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    J Am Coll Radiol 2020 Aug;17(8):1071-1072
  • "The advantage of constant monitoring is the ability to detect early changes, be they blood values, cardiac function including arrhythmia, or even just heart rate. Of course, these new developments must meet our standards by being transparent, intuitive, intimate, and con- stant. With the development of these changes, the entire health care system will undergo nothing short of a revo- lution. When one observes the health care environment and thinks about the classic companies involved, it is clear why newer players such as Amazon, Apple, Google, and Berkshire Hathaway are being looked at for developing new technology and methods of care.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    J Am Coll Radiol 2020 Aug;17(8):1071-1072
  • "Nevertheless, technological changes—particularly 5G networks, natural language processing, and artificial intelligence—provide what may be new opportunities for seamless integration of data and the improvement of care without disturbing or interrupting the patient’s daily life. When we are able to match the needs of patients with technology, then we can truly change the face of medicine for the better. Simply acquiring data or being intrusive will not be of value. And of course, successful solutions will need to be transparent, intuitive, intimate, and constant.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    J Am Coll Radiol 2020 Aug;17(8):1071-1072
  • “The evolving role of the patient as the primary mover in health care will be a change for radiology. A typical model was that physicians usually refer patients to specific imaging practices, but as patients become more involved as the primary mover of their health care, they will be seeking high quality at an acceptable cost. This trend was recently catalyzed by Walmart in collaboration with Covera Health. Covera has created a Radiology Centers of Excellence program, and large corporations like Walmart encourage their patients to undergo imaging in high-quality centers. The impetus for this was the recognition that low-quality imaging was precipi- tating unnecessary surgery for some patients.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    J Am Coll Radiol 2020 Aug;17(8):1071-1072
  • “Retail, finance, and virtually all other industries have undergone a digital transformation. Consumers have come to expect seamless transitions between their physical and digital experiences. We tap an app and expect our custom brew to be on the counter when we arrive at our local coffee shop. We enter an address into our telephone and expect a car to show up in minutes, to take us to our destination without ever opening our wallets. Health care, for good reason, is slower than most industries to embrace transformational change. Nonetheless, disruption coming. What is different is health care is being disrupted from the outside in by nontraditional houses from adjacent markets.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “Health care is 18% of the US economy, and an estimated 25% of the spending is nonproductive. Policy uncertainty, reactive incumbents, huge health industry scale, and 25% nonproductive spending all contribute to the second major trend: outside-in disruption.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “Legacy health players hold the key to transformation. Marquee institutions like Johns Hopkins, Cleveland Clinic, Partners, Mayo, Ascension, Stanford, MD Anderson, Kaiser Permanente, and others own the most crucial value driver in health care—trust. The challenge lies in how to convert this treasured asset into a compelling future amid industry change. There are two options: (1) defend your brand and operating model, or (2) leverage your brand into a trusted ecosystem to create a future fueled by the disruption.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “Defending is a natural first reflex, especially for an industry-leading brand. However, the results have not been positive for companies playing defense—not just in health care, but across industries. Fortune 500 companies have historically remained on the index for an average of 75 years. As the pivot to digital accelerated, the average tenure decreased significantly. Half of the Fortune 500 classes of 2000 were displaced in less than a decade. The takeaway here is embrace the disruption or be disrupted. In every market, winners are partnering to build ecosystems to drive new consumer engagement and operating models.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “Established health care brands will need to partner with each other and industry outsiders to create their desired future. The confluence of tech, policy, consumer demand, and emerging partnerships should signal to traditional health entities that now is the time to act.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “Trust is the fundamental value driver, and traditional health care brands own it. Outside disruptors will partner to get it. This is the market window to build your ecosystem and reposition your trusted health care brand in the new world order.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “Radiology is being disrupted by AI and other forces. Indeed, radiology will be transformed by emerging technologies more quickly than any other medical specialty, as is already occurring with AI. Radiology departments should lean in, harness the disruption, and build strategic partnerships to frame new delivery and business models. As a field, we should seek out opportunities to partner with emerging and nontra- ditional entities in the health care space to leverage synergies between our ap- proaches and the disruptive forces they can bring to bear on medicine.”
    Health Care Transformation From the Outside In
    Jim Traficant, Elliot K. Fishman, Linda C. Chu, Steven P. Rowe
    JACR (in press)
  • “So what is on the forefront of technological advancement for the home consumer? Health and wellness. The current paradigm of health care delivery is akin to driving a car on a given day and looking at the dash- board information, which is then blacked out for the rest of the year. A once-a-year physical examination with parameters from a single time point is very similar and leaves you with only a brief snapshot of a person’s health. In the future, your smart home will serve as a 24-hour health monitor.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    JACR 2020 (in press)
  • "The relative effectiveness of early disease diagnosis and monitoring made possible by annual visits or even more frequent regular visits to a physician’s office pales in comparison with the potential to improve health and wellness that constant monitoring by smart devices will provide. Determining how to accurately and efficiently analyze these massive data represents the next big implementation hurdle.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    JACR 2020 (in press)
  • “With the development of these changes, the entire health care system will undergo nothing short of a revolution. When one looks at the health care environment and thinks about the classic companies involved, it is clear why newer players such as Amazon, Apple, Google, and Berkshire Hathaway are being looked at for developing new technology and methods of care.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    JACR 2020 (in press)
  • “Based on 20 years of following technology, we have identified obstacles to the medical smart home. Most significant is the consumer concern about constant observation and potential issues with privacy. Consumers are understandably worried about the breadth of data being collected and with whom that data will be shared. The process of acquiring and controlling information will require regulatory oversight, which could add years to implementation.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    JACR 2020 (in press)
  • “Nevertheless, technological changes—particularly 5G networks, natural language processing, and artificial intelligence—provide what may be new opportunities for seamless integration of data and the improvement of care without disturbing or interrupting the patient’s daily life. When we are able to match the needs of patients with technology, then we can truly change the face of medicine for the better. Simply acquiring data or being intrusive will not be of value. And of course, successful solutions will need to be transparent, intuitive, intimate, and constant."
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    JACR 2020 (in press)
  • “As artificial intelligence masters image interpretation, radiologists must become more involved directly with patients or we will run the risk of becoming simply one more data point in management decision making. From determining the optimal examination for a patient to ensuring that critical information is communicated directly to patients when necessary to help them understand the results of their imaging tests, these elements of radiology practice need to be capitalized.”
    The Next Topic for Digital Tech Publishing—Your Health and Wellness
    Mark Larkin, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson
    JACR 2020 (in press)
  • “The incorporation of AI into radiology imaging modalities has already begun and can be envisioned to eventually impact all facets of image creation including pre-acquisition (patient positioning and protocol optimization), acquisition (iterative reconstruction, dose modulation, and automatic view detection), and post-acquisition (disease detection, lesion classification, organ and lesion segmentation, quantification of numerous parameters, and voice recognition). Although the post-acquisition aspects of AI incorporation into radiology will take the longest to find widespread clinical application, these are also potentially the most transformative.”
    What Health Care Can Learn From Self-Driving Vehicles.
    Powell K, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Johnson PT, Rowe SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2019 Feb;16(2):261-263.
  • "Furthermore, AI can be the foundation for intelligent hospitals and workflows. Indeed, over the next 5 years, AI will play an increasingly pervasive role in improving efficiency and workflow throughout health care. Of note, there are more than 200 AI startups in the health care industry, an almost overwhelming number working on numerous different applications. Methods of deploying this tremendous number of evolving AI tools are needed, and we may see the emergence of AI application stores where hospital systems can select the plat- forms that would be most beneficial to them."
    What Health Care Can Learn From Self-Driving Vehicles.
    Powell K, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Johnson PT, Rowe SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2019 Feb;16(2):261-263.
  • "Machine learning and AI are already beginning to be integrated into a number of facets of radiology. This includes the implementation of “intelligent instruments” such as CT scanners that can use integrated cameras to detect whether patient position is adequate for the study indication. In the near future, those same scanners will begin to choose and execute an optimized protocol including contrast bolus timing, contrast phases, and dose modulation, and then allow for advanced reconstruction and visualization such as automatic organ and lesion contouring, textural analysis, and cinematic rendering."
    What Health Care Can Learn From Self-Driving Vehicles.
    Powell K, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Johnson PT, Rowe SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2019 Feb;16(2):261-263.
  • “Although it is difficult to predict how health care will evolve through AI, we should not fear the influence of this rapidly evolving technology. Instead of thinking about AI replacing our abilities, we should instead view AI as allowing us to “level up” what we can accomplish. In radiology, having AI perform the mundane tasks that humans may struggle with or find interminable, such as pulmonary nodule detection or organ segmentation, as well as the tasks that are simply impossible for humans, such as extracting lesion textural features across multiple contrast phases or sequences, frees us to interact with the images in ways that can push the boundaries of diagnostic science. By using AI, we can add depth to our readings that can produce tangible benefits to patient care.”
    What Health Care Can Learn From Self-Driving Vehicles.
    Powell K, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Johnson PT, Rowe SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2019 Feb;16(2):261-263.
  • “Another important lesson I have learned is that there is always something “stupid” or “dumb” happening all the time in any organization—we just don’t recognize it unless it becomes a big enough problem. As you get higher in the organization, you see fewer and fewer of the problems, and frankly, the interconnections and relationships in a big company are so numerous and complex that no leader can completely understand or grasp them in any real way.”
    From Toy Story to CT Scans: Lessons From Pixar for Radiology
    Catmull E, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Sep;12(9):978-9.
  • “Finally, having an organization in which everyone feels empowered to suggest ideas and make contributions is critical if you hope to innovate”.
    From Toy Story to CT Scans: Lessons From Pixar for Radiology
    Catmull E, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Sep;12(9):978-9.
  • “Even worse, although I had established an open-door policy, I was told that the production staff had felt hesitant to voice their concerns because they didn’t want to be seen as “going over the head” of their coworkers. From that time on, my policy at Pixar has been that anyone can voice an opinion to anyone else without worrying about consequences or reprimand.”
    From Toy Story to CT Scans: Lessons From Pixar for Radiology
    Catmull E, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Sep;12(9):978-9.
  • Dr Catmull’s admonition about “hidden” aspects of an organization is very important. Radiologists may have a good sense of what is happening in departmental reading rooms, as the majority of radiologists in a department perform at least some clinical work. However, “other” facets of the department, including many patient-centric aspects of radiology, such as scheduling an appointment, patient parking, checking in with the receptionist in the waiting room, having an intravenous line placed by a nurse, or requesting one’s scan results, are all somewhat obscure in the minds of most radiologists but are critical in the “patient experience”.
    From Toy Story to CT Scans: Lessons From Pixar for Radiology
    Catmull E, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Sep;12(9):978-9.
  • “Dr Catmull stressed that candor is essential in an organization. It is dangerous when everyone in a meeting is afraid to speak up or voice their concerns, but once the meeting is over, they talk to one another in private about the real issues. Real concerns need to be addressed and corrected early, before they become huge and costly. As a leader, it is essential that you surround yourself with people who are honest and unafraid to disagree with you. As Dr Catmull nicely stated, “if there is more truth in the hallways than in meetings, you have a problem.”
    From Toy Story to CT Scans: Lessons From Pixar for Radiology
    Catmull E, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Sep;12(9):978-9.
  • “In all of the organizations I have worked, the best leaders and executives have been able to create work cultures that inspire both clients and their companies’ employees, and they have had the strength as leaders to drive the difficult changes needed to create those positive work cultures. Over the years, having seen both successful and un- successful businesses, I have become a strong believer that in order for your company to be successful, your employees must be happy, they must truly believe in their company and products, and they must be willing to put their clients first.”
    Improving Patient Care Through Inspiring Happiness.
    Kaplowitz M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Nov;12(11):1227-8
  • The success of any company starts with caring about your people, products, and clients, and of these three, I would argue that focusing on the happiness of your own employees may actually be most important for the long-term sustainability of your business. Without happy employees, it is difficult to maintain happy clients, no matter how good your product may be.
    Improving Patient Care Through Inspiring Happiness.
    Kaplowitz M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Nov;12(11):1227-8
  • At the core of a successful company lies a happy, motivated work-force that does not feel unduly stressed or burdened. Although many companies put a lot of emphasis on attracting the best talent to their workforces, it is my view that this alone is not sufficient, as a company must put equal emphasis on creating a high- performance workplace that allows those employees to maximize their potential.
    Improving Patient Care Through Inspiring Happiness.
    Kaplowitz M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Nov;12(11):1227-8
  • Over the course of our experience with the happiness training program, we have come away with five key lessons:
    * Happiness is a choice rather than something one is born with, and it can be taught to individuals who otherwise consider themselves unhappy.
    * Happiness requires the ability to balance one’s personal and public lives.
    Improving Patient Care Through Inspiring Happiness.
    Kaplowitz M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Nov;12(11):1227-8
  • * Feeling gratitude for the good things in one’s life can help suppress many of the negative emotions that can hinder happiness and success.
    *Nurturing positive relationships, and taking the time to acknowledge and express gratitude for the efforts of others, can help one feel better about oneself.
    * Learning optimism can help make people and businesses more successful.
    Improving Patient Care Through Inspiring Happiness.
    Kaplowitz M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Nov;12(11):1227-8
  • “We must not forget that the happiness of all our employees is critical to a practice’s success, not simply the happiness of its physicians alone. Support staff members, including nurses, receptionists, and technologists, are much more likely to directly interact with our patients (ie, customers), and if we have not taken the effort to create a positive, happy work culture for these employees, it is unlikely that they will be positive and engaging around our patients. and businesses more successful”.
    Improving Patient Care Through Inspiring Happiness.
    Kaplowitz M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Nov;12(11):1227-8
  • “To be successful, we need curiosity and the willingness to reach out to people from other disciplines who know things we do not know and are smarter than us. I subscribe to the 50- 50 rule: at least half of what I read is in fields unrelated to my own work.”

    
From Academia to Government to
Industry: A Strange Journey and Its Lessons Elias Zerhouni, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “Leadership requires heart, spine, and brains, as well as dominating one’s fear. When I first came to the United States, I had big dreams; I knew I could not put a full life in a small dream box. The ability of this country to attract the best is what makes America great.”


    From Academia to Government to
Industry: A Strange Journey and Its Lessons Elias Zerhouni, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “For radiology to flourish in the world of precision medicine, our specialty must reach out and collaborate with other disciplines. Remaining sheltered in our imaging silo could hamper success. For example, the development of deep learning as applied to medical imaging depends on radiologists’ working closely with computer scientists to identify the most promising applications and algorithms as well as with our colleagues in oncology and surgery to identify key clinical questions we need to address.”


    From Academia to Government to
Industry: A Strange Journey and Its Lessons Elias Zerhouni, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)
  • “1. Do work that matters, that is hard, and that we are uniquely able to do: Make sure that the problem you are working on matters to other people and is thus commercially viable work that can be funded. Remember, however, that unless you swing for the fences your company will almost certainly lose. If you don’t take risks in business, how can you hope to beat all those other incredible companies in the marketplace? The conservative move is the one that will put you out of business!”


    “From Gaming Machines to Thinking Machines . . . ”
 Huang JH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Aug;13(8):1008-9.
  • “2. Do work that brings us incredible joy: Realize that profits may not be there when you start. Use the pride and satisfaction in the work itself as a way to overcome those inevitable initial setbacks and obstacles.”


    “From Gaming Machines to Thinking Machines . . . ”
 Huang JH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Aug;13(8):1008-9.
  • “3. Believe in your vision knowing that the best customers may not, at first: It is a truism that several of our most successful innovations were products that consumers claimed to have no interest in prior to our developing them! Success as an innovator sometimes requires the foresight to see ahead of the customer’s current wants and desires.”


    “From Gaming Machines to Thinking Machines . . . ”
 Huang JH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Aug;13(8):1008-9.

  • “4. Although Jen-Hsun Huang’s development of a multibillion-dollar company may seem light-years away from the demands of running a local radiology practice, his advice to take “joy in your work” and “care about craftsmanship” is valid for any industry. Though it is easy to simply “mail it in” and provide a mediocre product, maintaining your long-term viability in a competitive industry requires caring a great deal about the quality of your product or service. Certainly, as in Silicon Valley, many radiology practices have encountered failure because they failed to realize that it is quality work that underpins financial success.”

    
“From Gaming Machines to Thinking Machines . . . ”
 Huang JH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Aug;13(8):1008-9.
  • “Coping with change is an intrinsically difficult part of the human experience, particularly in the business world. Although there are some who certainly enjoy change, it is undoubtedly true that the vast majority of leaders in the business world dread change as a result of its intrinsic unpredictability. Winston Churchill once said that “difficulties mastered are opportunities won,” although actually bringing oneself to make these changes in the face of adversity, particularly when running a business that is currently successful, can be quite difficult.”


    Media Leadership: Change Management
Keith A. Grossman, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Siva P. Raman
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.014
  • “It is easy to make changes in a failing company, but it is much harder to bring oneself to make changes in a thriving business as a result of impending or even theoretical changes about to affect the marketplace.”
 Media Leadership: Change Management

    
Keith A. Grossman, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Siva P. Raman
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.014
  • “Specifically, the current customers of a successful business are usually happy with the service they are receiving, are unlikely to perceive or understand changes in the marketplace that may be coming in the near future, and are unlikely to be happy with any abrupt changes brought about by the incumbent business. On the other hand, new entrants into the market, unencumbered by the expectations of any current customers, are much more likely to make the dramatic changes needed to respond to a constantly changing market.”
 Media Leadership: Change Management


    Keith A. Grossman, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Siva P. Raman
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.014
  • “As people running businesses, you have to figure out whether you want to be actively engaged at the center of the fight or simply a bystander in the initial stages. Although there might be a first- mover advantage in some cases, it is not always critical, or even preferable, that you necessarily be a leader in driving change within your industry, and sometimes staying on the sidelines and figuring out how things are going might be preferable.”
 Media Leadership: Change Management


    Keith A. Grossman, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Siva P. Raman
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.014
  • “Being a leader in a time of change requires that you define your “North Star,” or the fundamental aspects and goals of your business, and then work backward to figure out the best step forward. Every decision you make should bring you closer to that North Star. Once you make a decision, have the courage to “own” that decision: be confident and knowledgeable. Be able to articulate your message. Although being confident in your decisions is important, continuously “stress-test” the reality of your decisions and be prepared to change course if things are not working.”
 Media Leadership: Change Management

    
Keith A. Grossman, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Siva P. Raman
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.014
  • “One aspect of Mr Grossman’s talk we found particularly important was his stressing the idea that making necessary changes sometime means temporarily ignoring the short-term complaints of your customers, many of whom “like things the way they are.” That is particularly true in our field, in which changes in our practice pattern may affect not only our patients but also our many referring physicians. Perhaps in this time of rapid change in our industry, when changes may be required of us on a constant basis, consistently maintaining communication with our referring physicians and patients about the rationale behind our decisions might be critical as we go forward.”
 Media Leadership: Change Management

    
Keith A. Grossman, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Siva P. Raman
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.014
  • “Management is about doing things right, whereas leadership is about doing the right things.”


    Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27. 

  • “Leadership is a vague term, but it is readily apparent to everyone when it is absent. There always comes a time when there is a true test for an organization, and you then know who is a true leader. Leadership styles range from Attila the Hun to a consensus maker like Gandhi, and each style can be successful or a failure depending on the individual environment.”


    Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27. 

  • “Management guru Peter Drucker once said something like “the three most charismatic leaders in the 20th century were Hitler, Stalin, and Mao. Their problem was not bad charisma, it was bad mission.” Admittedly, I don’t have the perfect answer to this dilemma, but I will say that my experiences have taught me one lesson: never hire second best. If you can’t find the optimal candidate just restart your search.”

    
Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27. 

  • “Taking the time to listen to your people is critical, especially for someone like me, who is used to making quick decisions. Soon after taking my first leadership position, I quickly realized that I needed to be the last person who spoke at a meeting, rather than the first. An effective leader needs to hear both sides of an issue before making a proper decision.”


    Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27. 

  • “As a manager, you are almost al ways the last person to know about major problems, and your employees (often out of fear of conveying un- pleasant news) may not tell you about problems that can quickly snowball into larger catastrophes for your company. Listen to what your people tell you, but also try to understand their motivations to get better insights into why different people give you different information or advice.”

    
Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27.
  • “Just as important, the collective wisdom of crowds (or your employees) may not always be correct, and sometimes you have to “trust your gut” more than the advice you receive or even rational analysis. Listening to the people who work for you can also be critical for keeping your job! Leaders are ultimately fired not by their bosses but rather by the people below them.”


    Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27.
  • “The perfect leader is a person who is needed by the company more than he or she needs the company’s job. Be willing to make unpopular decisions that might even cost you your job if that is the right thing to do.”
Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27.
  • “Having the integrity to do the right thing, no matter what the personal consequences, is what ultimately differentiates the very best of leaders.”


    Learning About Leadership by Making Mistakes
Brody WR, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Jul 27.
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