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Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning

Practice Management: Facebook Imaging Pearls - Educational Tools | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ Practice Management ❯ Facebook

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  • “The preferred social platform for CTisus is Facebook. It provides the greatest flexibility in type of content that can be shared and ease of use, and it also provides an in-depth analytics tool to measure performance. Facebook enables sharing of photos, mp4files, live videos, links, and posted text. Text posts have a generous 60,000-character limit as opposed to the Twitter limit of 280 characters. Facebook also enables scheduling of posts, which is extremely helpful tomanage Ctisus high post volume strategy. CTisus posts about 15 to 20 times a day to Facebook with awide range of content: CT case studies, medical illustrations, pearls relevant to radiology, management tips, and current articles relating to health and medicine.”
    Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516
  • ”Two-thirds of US adults get their news from social media. CTisus strives to provide a variety of content to satisfy user’s craving for information. In efforts to appeal to a larger audience and maintain a positive message,CTisus shares factual articles and tends to leave out opinion pieces. Users are driven from Facebook to the website, CTisus.com, for a broad range of strictly educational resources that pertain to radiology.”
    Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516
  • “ In April 2016, Facebook launched a live broadcast tool, which Ctisus started using in March 2017 as a new way to engage users. Once a week at the same time, CTisus hosts a brief live discussion on a topic related toradiology. Users have the ability topost questions in the live interface,and CTisus can answer in real time viatext or voice. Based on positive engagement and user feedback from Facebook users, CTisus began broadcasting the same live discussion on Instagram in October 2017. Twitter also has live broadcasting ca-pabilities, which CTisus is considering testing.”
    Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516
  • “In April 2016,Facebook launcheda live broadcast tool, which Ctisus started using in March 2017 as a new way to engage users. Once a week atthe same time, CTisus hosts a brief live discussion on a topic related to radiology. Users have the ability to post questions in the live interface,and CTisus can answer in real time via text or voice. Based on positive engagement and user feedback from Facebook users, CTisus began broadcasting the same live discussion on Instagram in October 2017.Twitter also has live broadcasting capabilities, which CTisus is considering testing.
    Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516
  • “In 2016, CTisus joined Insta-gram because of its popularity in thesocial media space, particularly among medical students. In just under a year, the CTisus Instagram account outperformed Twitter withover 2,100 followers. The Instagram app is an infinite scroll of images with a small text caption beneath; this model works well with the image-heavy field of radiology. Instagram posts are limited to square images, 2,200 characters, video lengths of less than 1 min, and no links, and you can only post from a mobile device.”
    Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516

  • Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516
  • “For CTisus, social media has proven invaluable in expanding outreach to achieve our mission of worldwide content distribution. Regular review of use patterns through analytics is important to understand what users want and to drive quality improvement. Students and trainees, who represent the future of the medical profession, are heavily dependent on these platforms. Medical educators interested in global outreach shouldmaster these tools to easily provide free medical education dissemination on an international scale.”
    Social Media for Global Education: Pearls and Pitfalls of Using Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    Thomas RB, Johnson PT, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Oct;15(10):1513-1516
  • “Facebook Live is a free, easy-to-use, and easy-to-access online resource for live, interactive educational delivery, which has quickly become one of our most popular social media channels. This venue provides students, trainees,and medical providers around the world with unprecedented access to leaders in the field. Educators interested in delivering free medical education resources on a global scale should engage in this activity”
    Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform.
    Johnson PT, Thomas RB, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Jan;15(1 Pt B):201-204.
  • “In 2016, Facebook (Menlo Park,California, USA) launched an on-line live broadcast platform. “Face-book Live” was created as a way for users to communicate to their friends and followers in real-time. Clicking the“go live” button within Facebook automatically en-gages your computer’s camera and microphone and begins streaming a live video. Along with the video,this platform also has a comments section, which allows the host and viewers to post and respond to comments during the live feed. Once the live feed has ended, Facebook automatically posts the recording to the user’s Facebook page for further viewing and commenting.”
    Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform.
    Johnson PT, Thomas RB, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Jan;15(1 Pt B):201-204.
  • “Each week, the faculty lead discusses one topic relevant to the body CT; occasionally, a guest who is an expert in the topic being discussed joins the discussion. Throughout the live feed, the presenter can monitor and answer questions posted in the comments via verbal response; additionally, one can respond to questions posted after the live feed has ended. Overall, the live feature within Facebook is incredibly intuitive and produces a high-quality output with very little render time. Facebook offers a built-in analytics tool, Facebook Insights,which provides performance data oneach post.”
    Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform.
    Johnson PT, Thomas RB, Fishman EK.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Jan;15(1 Pt B):201-204.
  • “Although health care lags behind many other industries in adopting social media as part of a business strategy, the Mayo Clinic recognized the importance of these applications more than a decade ago. In addition to typical media relations and marketing tactics, the Mayo Clinic has successfully used social media as part of an overall program to support the strategic imperatives of the institution.”
    The Strategic Imperative for the Use of Social Media in Health Care
    Journal of the American College of Radiology, Volume 15, Issue 1, Part B, 2018, pp. 155-161
    Amy L. Kotsenas et al.
  • “Social media tools enable health information dissemination via channels that patients already frequent. This gives health care providers the powerful ability to communicate in a one-to-many fashion, as opposed to the standard health care approach of one to one, exponentially increasing the reach of high-quality educational content. Also, rather than waiting until people perform online searches for health concerns, institutions can proactively send information regarding conditions, treatments, and preventive care to consumers’ social media newsfeeds.This content is often packaged in “bite-size” pieces that allow easy understanding by health consumers and canalso direct them to additional educational content, on a website for example, if they seek more thorough information.”
    The Strategic Imperative for the Use of Social Media in Health Care
    Journal of the American College of Radiology, Volume 15, Issue 1, Part B, 2018, pp. 155-161
    Amy L. Kotsenas et al.
  • “Facebook Live is a free, easy-to-use, and easy-to-access online resource for live, interactive educational delivery, which has quickly become one of our most popular social media channels. This venue provides students, trainees, and medical providers around the world with unprecedented access to leaders in the field. Educators interested in delivering free medical education resources on a global scale should engage in this activity.”


    Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform.
Johnson PT, Thomas RB, Fishman EK.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Nov 1. pii: S1546-1440

  • “Facebook Live” was created as a way for users to communicate to their friends and followers in real-time. Clicking the “go live” button within Facebook automatically engages your computer’s camera and microphone and begins streaming a live video. Along with the video, this platform also has a comments section, which allows the host and viewers to post and respond to comments during the live feed. Once the live feed has ended, Facebook automatically posts the recording to the user’s Facebook page for further viewing and commenting.”


    Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform.
Johnson PT, Thomas RB, Fishman EK.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Nov 1. pii: S1546-1440
  • “Based on user feedback, CTisus recognized one limitation to Facebook Live is the ability to show images (ie, digital CT scans), which is a major component in radiology education. With the recommendation of a viewer, CTisus began using a third-party screen-sharing software, OBS (Panama City, Panama). This free tool allows you to stream a split screen between live video and PowerPoint (Microsoft, Redmond, Washington, USA) without compromising sound or image quality. The downside to using this third-party software is that real-time comments are not present in the OBS window. However, this can be resolved by setting up another device to open Facebook and view the comments alongside OBS. OBS takes a few more steps to set up the live stream than using Facebook independently, but it greatly improves the educational opportunity for the viewers.”

    
Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform.
Johnson PT, Thomas RB, Fishman EK.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Nov 1. pii: S1546-1440
  • Who uses Facebook?

  • Who owns a smartphone?

  • “ As educators embrace new educational distribution platforms, it should be recognized that the social media website Facebook is a potentially far-reaching and valuable venue. CTisus, an educational website focused on information about Computed Tomography (CT), uses Facebook page to educate medical professionals, many of whom are millennials. The purpose of this brief communication is to analyze the demographics, interests and behavior of CTisus Facebook
users, using data from Facebook insights.” 


    New Frontiers in Education:
Facebook as Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson,Rachel T. Black
Pamela T. Johnson, MD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD
JACR  (in press)
  • “Facebook is a potentially valuable educational tool for the generation that uses social media, because it directly delivers information to users in a way to which they have become accustomed. When a user connects to a Facebook page, that page’s posts are delivered to the user’s personal page in real time, so that information is directly communicated to the user in a timely fashion, rather than the user having to search for new information.  Emerging publications report the utility of Facebook as a medium for medical education.” 


    New Frontiers in Education:
Facebook as Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson,Rachel T. Black
Pamela T. Johnson, MD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD
JACR  (in press)
  • “A “like” represents a connection to a Facebook page. Once an individual likes someone’s page, all of the information posted on this page will appear in his or her “News Feed” in real time, keeping the user updated on the page’s activity. The “News Feed” is the information presented to the Facebook user every time they open their own personal page. It is continuously updated as their “contacts”, people and organizations to whom they are connected, post information.” 


    New Frontiers in Education:
Facebook as Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson,Rachel T. Black
Pamela T. Johnson, MD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD
JACR  (in press)
  • “Facebook has been embraced by medical professionals and medical institutions to promote health awareness, develop research projects, facilitate patient and student education, improve consultation and collaboration, increase disease awareness, and describe best-practice guidelines . As our emerging publications and our experience reveal, Facebook should be recognized as a far-reaching means to deliver information and educational materials.” 


    New Frontiers in Education:
Facebook as Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson,Rachel T. Black
Pamela T. Johnson, MD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD
JACR  (in press)
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