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Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning

Practice Management: Educator Imaging Pearls - Educational Tools | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ Practice Management ❯ Educator

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  • “It is 2020 now, and I’m still sitting in lectures with endless slide presentations and endless bul- let points. I have a tablet sitting in front of me, and before the faculty member goes through all 10 bullet points on the slide, I have already looked at multiple imaging examples of the diagnosis being discussed on STATdx (Elsevier, Atlanta, Ga) and read about the entity in Radio- Graphics. Technology has revolutionized the way we learn, but our style of classroom teaching has not evolved to embrace it appropriately.”
    Back to the Future: Shortcomings of an Archaic Model for Radiology Lectures
    Durga Sivacharan Gaddam, Omer A. Awan
    RadioGraphics 2020; 40:1196–1197
  • "The real challenge for educators is to engage this new breed of learners who are extremely versatile at accessing the enormous amounts of information available to them instantaneously. Although it presents a challenge, this versatility can certainly be advantageous for the lecturer,as teaching material could be curated to address more complex aspects of a topic. Trainees could be relied on to be more proactive with self-learning regarding the basics. One example that comes to mind is imaging of a cholangiocarcinoma. Searching through various primary sources online would give me a plethora of images of classic-appearing cholangiocarcinomas within a few minutes. During lecture, an attending physician could address the atypical appearances of a cholangiocarcinoma from a case file that I would otherwise not have access to. This would allow the trainee to develop a deeper, complex, more practical understanding of this particular topic.”
    Back to the Future: Shortcomings of an Archaic Model for Radiology Lectures
    Durga Sivacharan Gaddam, Omer A. Awan
    RadioGraphics 2020; 40:1196–1197
  • "These are just some of the techniques that can be used to transition radiology education from passive instruction to more active learning. Iam sure that there are many additional methods being implemented that are more effective than the current slide-after-slide monotony. Perhaps a starting point could be to implement a hybrid method of teaching that involves both workstation simulation and brief slide presentations.The point is that if the purpose of a lecture is to transmit useful and practical knowledge to a learner, why do faculty continue to teach in styles that are not conducive to this fundamental goal?”
    Back to the Future: Shortcomings of an Archaic Model for Radiology Lectures
    Durga Sivacharan Gaddam, Omer A. Awan
    RadioGraphics 2020; 40:1196–1197
  • “With the ongoing fear of the pandemic, and the conflicting data regarding possible spread from surfaces, being able to have voice commands decrease risk and provides the ability to bypass common danger points from elevator buttons to door knobs to credit card processing machines. Outside of the individual, the increasing presence of voice-enabled devices affects the data-gathering and research approaches to this pandemic as well as to future public health crises. These devices can facilitate the sharing and gathering of information, provide near instantaneous updated information, and facilitate the pooling of data for use by public health experts and artificial intelligence algorithms.”
    Connecting With Patients: The Rapid Rise of Voice Right Now
    Isbitski D, Fishman EK, Rowe SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2020;S1546-1440(20)30666-9. [published online ahead of print, 2020 July 17].
  • "The combination of rapidly advancing voice-enabled technology and the social changes we have seen because of the coronavirus have driven the adoption of voice as a potential transformative way that patients can obtain information and communicate with their health care providers. Because of the changes that have already occurred, we can expect that we will never go back entirely to how things were and that voice will be an increasingly important influence on health care.”
    Connecting With Patients: The Rapid Rise of Voice Right Now
    Isbitski D, Fishman EK, Rowe SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2020;S1546-1440(20)30666-9. [published online ahead of print, 2020 July 17].  
  • "The focus on artificial intelligence in radiology has been on the use of algorithms to enhance image interpretation and uncover imaging bio- markers. However, artificial intelligence will have profound impacts across radiology practices, and the rise of voice-enabled devices indicates that. We can expect that patient preparation, explanations of studies, and the consenting process will be well handled by voice-enabled devices with artificial intelligence algorithms.”
    Connecting With Patients: The Rapid Rise of Voice Right Now
    Isbitski D, Fishman EK, Rowe SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2020;S1546-1440(20)30666-9. [published online ahead of print, 2020 July 17]. 
  • "Successful practices that emerge from the coronavirus pandemic in strong positions will find ways to leverage artificial intelligence, and voice-enabled technologies can play a large role in that. Our day-to-day work in our offices will also change. Voice-enabled technologies can finally help us to realize the “paperless” office. Our phone calls, dictations, and communications with colleagues can all be done in a contactless way using voice.”
    Connecting With Patients: The Rapid Rise of Voice Right Now
    Isbitski D, Fishman EK, Rowe SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2020;S1546-1440(20)30666-9. [published online ahead of print, 2020 July 17]. 
  • “Medical education is not immune to these trends, as the average student debt after completing medical school in 2014 now stands at $175,000, nearly double what it was in 1992. Medical school costs are currently increasing at nearly twice the rate of inflation, and it now takes many medical school graduates 20 years or more to pay off their debts.”


    An Eruption of Disruption: The Changing Landscape of Both Teaching and Learning 
William E. Kirwan, PhD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman, MD 
J American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 7 , 868 - 870
  • “One promising development is the creation of adaptive learning software platforms, which provide students with personalized tutoring and instructors with real-time information about how well students have grasped the content of their lectures. In such systems, these platforms serve as an interactive teaching tool that “adaptively” tailors the educational presentation depending on how well (or poorly) an individual student grasps the subject matter.”


    An Eruption of Disruption: The Changing Landscape of Both Teaching and Learning 
William E. Kirwan, PhD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman, MD 
J American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 7 , 868 - 870
  • “There are hundreds of radiology residencies across the country, each of which, to some degree, is repro- ducing the same basic educational curriculum in many different ways. Is it possible that new technologies might allow radiology residencies to pool their efforts? Why should every residency in the country have its faculty members, for example, put together a lecture on “imaging of 
pancreatic masses” when a single MOOCs or adaptive learning platform from a true subject matter expert might suffice?”


    An Eruption of Disruption: The Changing Landscape of Both Teaching and Learning 
William E. Kirwan, PhD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman, MD 
J American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 7 , 868 - 870
  • “Educators in graduate medical education must recognize that our traditional educational content might not be the best way of training this new “wired” generation of radiology residents and that the implementation of these new technologies might be necessary to provide the best educational experience.”


    An Eruption of Disruption: The Changing Landscape of Both Teaching and Learning 
William E. Kirwan, PhD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman, MD 
J American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 7 , 868 - 870
  • “At the very least, as educators, medical school faculty members will need to be prepared for college students coming into medicine who are increasingly accustomed to, and expecting, technology-enhanced learning experiences, so-called hybrid courses, and active learning environments. Just as important, cost control in medical education has proved to be as challenging as in the rest of the university, and these technologies might allow schools to reduce the cost of a medical education.”


    An Eruption of Disruption: The Changing Landscape of Both Teaching and Learning 
William E. Kirwan, PhD, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman, MD 
J American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 7 , 868 - 870
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