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Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning


Oral Contrast

question1. Why do we use oral contrast?
question2. What kind of oral contrast do we use?
question3. When do we use positive agents and when do we use neutral agents?
question4. What are the advantages of oral LOCM (Omnipaque)?
question5. Is there any contraindication to the use of oral contrast?
question6. If a patient has had a prior reaction to IV contrast can we still use oral contrast?
question

7. Part 1: When does the patient get the oral contrast relative to the time the patients get the actual CT scan?

Part 2: Does this differ between inpatients and outpatients?

question8. Are there any other oral contrast agents that are used?
questionThere are a number of agents that can be used but are not routinely used at Hopkins. Milk for example can be used but we tend to save it for our morning coffee and breakfast cereal.

Two references to milk are listed below.


"Milk contains 4% fat and slows peristalsis and gives good distension of small bowel."

Cost Effectiveness and Patient Tolerance of Low-Attenuation Oral Contrast Material: Milk Versus VoLumen
Koo CW et al.
AJR 2008; 190:1307-1313


"Whole milk is comparable to VoLumen with respect to bowel distension and bowel wall visualization and has a lower cost, better patient acceptance, and fewer adverse symptoms. Milk is a cost effective alternative to VoLumen as a low attenuation oral contrast agent."

Cost Effectiveness and Patient Tolerance of Low-Attenuation Oral Contrast Material: Milk Versus VoLumen
Koo CW et al.
AJR 2008; 190:1307-1313

question9. Can you use a single bottle of Omnipaque -350 at multiple time points by drawing 10-20 cc at a time to use to mix oral contrast?
question10. What is VoLumen and when do you use it?

 

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