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Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning

Cardiac: Cinematic Rendering Cardiothoracic Imaging Pearls - Educational Tools | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ Cardiac ❯ Cinematic Rendering Cardiothoracic

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  • “Additional considerations that refine CR photorealism include the incorporation of shadowing effects that derive from assuming that the light source can be obscured by objects within the visualized volume. Such shadowing is not typically included in traditional VR, although it is possible to incorporate.8 Furthermore, while CR can use one or more unidirectional light sources as is done in VR, more typically an en- vironment map is used (i.e. texture maps that are related to the brightnesses of surfaces within a virtual scene and more accurately reflect realistic lighting scenarios).”

    
Cinematic rendering of cardiac CT volumetric data: Principles and initial observations 
Steven P. Rowe, Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography 12 (2018) 56–59 

  • “Kawasaki’s disease (KD) is a vasculitis that predominantly affects children and can lead to the development of coronary artery aneurysms. These aneurysms can subsequently thrombose and occlude, which may lead to chest pain and other signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome in young patients. Coronary CT angiography, including 3D visualization techniques, is a common modality used in the follow-up of KD patients. In this series of three patients, we present the typical coronary artery imaging findings that can appear in these patients, with an emphasis on the use of the novel 3D technique of cinematic rendering (CR). CR utilizes a different lighting model than other 3D methods and is able to produce highly-detailed, photorealistic images. The potential advantages of CR images in understanding the complex mediastinal vascular anatomy and the relationships of coronary artery aneurysms to other anatomic structures are emphasized.”


    Evaluation of Kawasaki’s disease-associated coronary artery aneurysms with 3D CT cinematic rendering 
Steven P. Rowe1 & Stefan L. Zimmerman1 & Pamela T. Johnson1 & Elliot K. Fishman 
 Emergency Radiology (in press)
  • “The most important potential complication of KD is in- flammatory damage to the coronary arteries, which classically leads to the formation of coronary artery aneurysms. These aneurysms will often undergo vascular remodeling and partial 
thrombosis in order to produce a psuedonormal vascular lu- men. However, progressive thrombosis and other stenotic pro- cesses such as fibrosis can, over time, precipitate cardiac is- chemia that can lead to emergency room presentations for chest pain or other signs of acute coronary syndrome and necessitate invasive and/or surgical interventions. Of note, computed tomography (CT) angiography, including 3D methods such as volume rendering (VR), has been found to provide suitable non-invasive evaluation of the coronary arteries in patients with KD.”


    Evaluation of Kawasaki’s disease-associated coronary artery aneurysms with 3D CT cinematic rendering 
Steven P. Rowe1 & Stefan L. Zimmerman1 & Pamela T. Johnson1 & Elliot K. Fishman 
 Emergency Radiology (in press)
  • “As with other 3D visualization methods, CR would be expected to provide a global overview of the disease process that is not easily appreciated on 2D axial or multi-planar reformatted images. In particular, this may help to identify relatively distal, small caliber sites of aneurysmal enlargement, which stand out with high contrast on the 3D images but can be subtle when only 2D images are viewed. Given the anatomic complexity of the mediastinum with many adjacent vascular structures, it may be that CR has intrinsic advantages relative to other 3D methods in being able to accurately display the relative positions of those structures in a manner that may be more intuitively grasped in comparison to less photorealistic depictions.”


    Evaluation of Kawasaki’s disease-associated coronary artery aneurysms with 3D CT cinematic rendering 
Steven P. Rowe1 & Stefan L. Zimmerman1 & Pamela T. Johnson1 & Elliot K. Fishman 
 Emergency Radiology (in press)
  • “Even if CR demonstrates no, or only marginal, advantages relative to VR in terms of clinical applicability, the photorealistic appeal of these images will almost certainly lead to wide- spread use in trainee and patient education.”


    Evaluation of Kawasaki’s disease-associated coronary artery aneurysms with 3D CT cinematic rendering 
Steven P. Rowe1 & Stefan L. Zimmerman1 & Pamela T. Johnson1 & Elliot K. Fishman 
 Emergency Radiology (in press)
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