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  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to assess features of patient satisfaction scores for U.S. radiologists using a popular physician rating website.


    CONCLUSION: 
    Overall, most radiologists rated online by their patients score well, but reviews tended to be either strongly positive or negative. Scores across various categories are highly correlated, suggesting that there is a halo effect. Radiologists should recognize the effect of both facility- and radiologist-related factors in influencing patients' overall perceptions.


    How Satisfied Are Patients With Their Radiologists? Assessment Using a National Patient Ratings Website.
Ginocchio LA, Duszak R Jr, Rosenkrantz AB
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2017 May;208(5):W178-W183
  • “Nearly 60% of radiologist respondents use social networking for professional purposes. Radiology is likely to see growth in the role of social networking in the coming years as nearly half of professional users are radiology trainees. Twitter use for professional purposes among radiologists was disproportionately male. It is important to be cognizant of gender imbalance and to improve visibility of female leaders on social networking.”


    Professional Social Networking in Radiology: Who Is There and What Are They Doing?
Patel SS, Hawkins CM, Rawson JV, Hoang JK
Acad Radiol. 2017 May;24(5):574-579
  • “RadiologyInfo provides a tangible demonstration of how radiologists can engage directly with the global public to educate them on the value of radiology in their health care and to allay concerns and dispel misconceptions. Regular self-assessment and responsive planning will ensure its continued growth and relevance.”


    Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org.
Rubin GD, Krishnaraj A ,Mahesh M, Rajendran RR, Fishman EK
J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 May;14(5):697-702.

  • “RadiologyInfo.org is a public information portal designed to support patient care and broaden public awareness of the essential role radiology plays in overall patient health care. Over the past 14 years, RadiologyInfo.org has evolved considerably to provide access to more than 220 mixed-media descriptions of tests, treatments, and diseases through a spectrum of mobile and desktop platforms, social media, and downloadable documents in both English and Spanish..”


    Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org.
Rubin GD, Krishnaraj A ,Mahesh M, Rajendran RR, Fishman EK
J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 May;14(5):697-702.

  • “As patients continue to turn to online resources for health care information to guide their care decisions, it is becoming increasingly important for radiologists to engage with patients online via social media platforms. There are many ways physicians can use social media to provide patients with valuable information and improve the overall patient experience. By optimizing online discoverability, curating radiology content, engaging with patient communities, and producing mineable social media content, radiologists can emerge as thought leaders in this new form of patient-centered communication and information exchange.”

    
Social Media and the Patient Experience.
Hawkins CM1, DeLaO AJ2, Hung C3
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Dec;13:1615-1621
  • PURPOSE: To assess the content of currently available YouTube videos seeking to educate patients regarding commonly performed imaging examinations.

    
CONCLUSIONS: Educational patient videos on YouTube regarding common imaging examinations received high public interest and may provide a valuable patient resource. Videos most consistently provided information detailing the examination experience and less consistently provided safety information or described the presence and role of the radiologist.


    Assessing the Content of YouTube Videos in Educating Patients Regarding Common Imaging Examinations.
Rosenkrantz AB1, Won E2, Doshi AM2
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Dec;13(12 Pt A):1509-1513

  • “Developing a consistent brand and presence in the work setting, on social media accounts, and in professional organizations at the local, national, and international levels is the ultimate goal. At present, very little, if any, formal training is provided on personal branding skills such as these in current residency curricula, and it is critical for radiologists to fill their gaps in knowledge through additional means.”


    Personal Branding: A Primer for Radiology Trainees and Radiologists.
Kalia V1, Patel AK2, Moriarity AK3, Canon CL4.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jul;14(7):971-975
  • Social Media in Medicine
    Social Media
  • Social Media in Radiology
    Social Media
  • Facebook Live
    Facebook Live
  • Instagram
    Instagram
  • “For each enterprise or institution, the name is inextricably attached to the value of the brand. It is the responsibility of the enterprise or institution to make sure the attributes and values attached to the brand are upheld, ensuring that the brand equity is maintained or improved. Why? Because the brand helps attract customers and attract the best staff and allows a company to charge a premium for its products and services.”


    The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Once your brand experience is established and equity is accrued, it is paramount to protect that eq- uity. If your institution were a chain of fine hotels, say the Four Seasons, what would happen to the brand equity if one of the properties did not provide the same level of service as the others? Or if the hotel you always stayed in suddenly began to erode in quality? Would your opinion of the whole chain change? Would you still recommend it as your favorite place to stay? Probably not. Consistency is key, and it’s something the entire organization has to believe in and convey.”


    The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Perception is crucial. Health care facilities can positively affect patients’ perceptions by ameliorating the experience surrounding the delivery of health care itself. A relative of mine recounts the experience of undergoing a thyroidectomy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital. The family waited in a beautifully appointed waiting room, could be easily contacted using a sensor device loaned to them by the hospital, and were able to follow the journey of their loved one on a monitor, also via sensor. This was not only comforting for the family but, just as importantly, gave them a sense that the facility was indeed state of the art.”


    The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • “The kinds of people who work in your company matter: When you consider a candidate, include a personality test, strive to hire happy, empathetic people, and then keep them that way. 
Create an environment that fosters that type of personality and ensure that peer employees partici- pate in the process. Have potential hires interviewed by their peers so that the entire team is invested in the new employee’s success.”


    The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Employees should understand that they are all ambassadors of the brand. In your institution, your patients are bound to have many interactions with various employees before they meet you. Some patients will share their experiences on social media. Alongside many excellent reviews celebrating the superb care offered by your institution, one can read other comments lamenting the long wait times, dirty chairs in the waiting room of the emergency department, and perceived rudeness of some of the staff members. Through social media, negative per- ceptions can be spread to large audiences, adversely affecting your brand.”

    
The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • “A brand does not live inside the walls of a company. It lives in the hearts and minds of your patients, your employees, and your community. And your brand is even more emotionally charged than almost all others. For your patients, your brand is in their hands because their life is in your hands.”


    The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • Radiology personnel: Receptionists and technologists are the face of a practice. We have to invest in them and promote a patient-friendly and efficiency culture. 
Physical layout: Although radiologists justifiably focus on acquiring state-of-the-art equipment, well-designed facilities project an image of competence and efficiency. 
Communication: Radiologists need to embrace opportunities to reach out to patients, for example, by making themselves available to answer potential questions through a phone number or e-mail address included in the report.”


    The Importance of Brand Name.
Freeman M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Sheth S
 J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Jun 14. pii: [Epub ahead of print]
  • “As the organ shortage continues to grow, the creation of social media communities by transplant centers and the public is rapidly expanding to increase the number of living donors. Social media communities are arranged in myriad ways, and without standardization, raising concerns about potential recipients' and potential donors' autonomy and quality of care. Social media communities magnify and modify extant ethical issues in deceased and living donation related to privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and informed consent, and increase the potential for undue influence and coercion for potential living donors and transplant candidates. Currently, no national ethical guidelines have been developed in the U.S. regarding the use of social media to foster organ transplantation. We provide an ethical framework to guide transplant stakeholders in using social media for public and patient communication about transplantation and living donation, and offer recommendations for transplant clinical practice and future research.”


    Social Media and Organ Donation: Ethically Navigating the Next Frontier.
Henderson ML et al.
Am J Transplant. 2017 Jul 25. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14444. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “As the organ shortage continues to grow, the creation of social media communities by transplant centers and the public is rapidly expanding to increase the number of living donors. Social media communities are arranged in myriad ways, and without standardization, raising concerns about potential recipients' and potential donors' autonomy and quality of care. Social media communities magnify and modify extant ethical issues in deceased and living donation related to privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and informed consent, and increase the potential for undue influence and coercion for potential living donors and transplant candidates. Currently, no national ethical guidelines have been developed in the U.S. regarding the use of social media to foster organ transplantation.”


    Social Media and Organ Donation: Ethically Navigating the Next Frontier.
Henderson ML et al.
Am J Transplant. 2017 Jul 25. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14444. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Cancer patients and their caregivers are increasingly using social media as a platform to share cancer experiences, connect with support, and exchange cancer-related information. Yet, little is known about the nature and scientific accuracy of cancer-related information exchanged on social media. We conducted a content analysis of 12 months of data from 18 publically available Facebook Pages hosted by parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (N = 15,852 posts) and extracted all exchanges of medically-oriented cancer information. We systematically coded for themes in the nature of cancer-related information exchanged on personal Facebook Pages and two oncology experts independently evaluated the scientific accuracy of each post.” 

    
Is Cancer Information Exchanged on Social Media Scientifically Accurate?
Gage-Bouchard EA et al.
J Cancer Educ. 2017 Jul 19. doi: 10.1007/s13187-017-1254-z. [Epub ahead of print
  • “Of the 15,852 total posts, 171 posts contained medically-oriented cancer information. The most frequent type of cancer information exchanged was information related to treatment protocols and health services use (35%) followed by information related to side effects and late effects (26%), medication (16%), medical caregiving strategies (13%), alternative and complementary therapies (8%), and other (2%). Overall, 67% of all cancer information exchanged was deemed medically/scientifically accurate, 19% was not medically/scientifically accurate, and 14% described unproven treatment modalities. These findings highlight the potential utility of social media as a cancer-related resource, but also indicate that providers should focus on recommending reliable, evidence-based sources to patients and caregivers.” 


    Is Cancer Information Exchanged on Social Media Scientifically Accurate?
Gage-Bouchard EA et al.
J Cancer Educ. 2017 Jul 19. doi: 10.1007/s13187-017-1254-z. [Epub ahead of print
  • “The health care industry has recognized the importance of the patient experience. We believe that the biggest driver of patient experience is medical staff experience. If we want to increase patient experience, we must first improve the experience of the medical staff and providers.”


    Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “What we found through our work with hospitals around the country is that when patients walk into a hospital where each department is color coded by group, the hospital logo is embroidered on every top, and all the scrubs and laboratory coats are well fitted and pressed, it changes how they think about the institution. From the patients’ perspective, they trust the doctors and nurses, and their opinions of the providers’ performance improve exponentially.”

    
Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “Many patients are visiting your department for the first time. Their confidence in the quality of the care you deliver will be influenced by the appearance of your physicians, house staff, nurses, and technologists. Making sure the “uniform” is a quality presentation may improve patients’ perceptions of your department’s and institution’s quality. The proper dress code may have positive unintended consequences. On the other hand, if the point of contact to the providing care team is poorly dressed (ie, wrinkled or poorly fitting scrubs), patients may 
become concerned about the entire operation.”

    
Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “In my field of marketing, stories are often more important than hard facts because a brand or company’s stories shape its reality. I believe a company’s destiny follows its story. Companies that want to increase their market share and change their destiny need to begin by sharing their story, and the story must be carefully crafted to instill in the viewer a sense of the character of the business, not just the product they sell.”


    The Power of Stories in Brands, Business, and Life 
Anna Griffin, BS, Madison B. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, 
Karen M. Horton, MD, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR Volume 14, Issue 4, April 2017, Pages 573–574.
  • “A company’s story is not just a vehicle to sell its product, but can also be used to humanize the customer’s relationship with the organization. Some marketing campaigns have focused on sharing the personality of the company’s employees, which transforms the customer’s view of the company from a corporation to a consortium of talented, engaging individuals. The company is personalized by introducing the people who drive its operations as people rather than “divisions.” .

    ”
The Power of Stories in Brands, Business, and Life 
Anna Griffin, BS, Madison B. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, 
Karen M. Horton, MD, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR Volume 14, Issue 4, April 2017, Pages 573–574.
  • “A radiology practice’s success hinges on attracting the best staff and providers. Recruitment campaigns should create marketing materials that incorporate images and video to best convey the character and the mission of the organization. People want to be part of organizations that have an important mission .”

    
The Power of Stories in Brands, Business, and Life 
Anna Griffin, BS, Madison B. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, 
Karen M. Horton, MD, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR Volume 14, Issue 4, April 2017, Pages 573–574.
  • “Similarly, residency and fellowship training programs can engage medical student applicants with online video clips designed to illustrate the resident culture. One of the most common metrics that students describe in their decision-making process is “whether I feel like it’s a good fit.” Web-based resources that tell the story of life within a department can be very effective in the competitive recruitment arena. Additionally, telling the story of how other successful trainees have gone on to become leaders in the field is a powerful draw, because it could become the applicant’s story.”

    
The Power of Stories in Brands, Business, and Life 
Anna Griffin, BS, Madison B. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman, MD, 
Karen M. Horton, MD, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR Volume 14, Issue 4, April 2017, Pages 573–574.
  • ”RadiologyInfo.org is a public information portal designed to support patient care and broaden public awareness of the essential role radiology plays in overall patient health care. Over the past 14 years, RadiologyInfo.org has evolved considerably to provide access to more than 220 mixed-media descriptions of tests, treatments, and diseases through a spectrum of mobile and desktop platforms, social media, and downloadable documents in both English and Spanish. In 2014, the RSNA-ACR Public Information Website Committee, which stewards RadiologyInfo.org, developed 3- to 5-year strategic and implementation plans for the website. The process was informed by RadiologyInfo.org user surveys, formal stakeholder interviews, focus groups, and usability testing.”

    
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh 
Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • 
“Over the past year, visits to RadiologyInfo.org have increased by 60.27% to 1,424,523 in August 2016 from 235 countries and territories. Twenty-two organizations have affiliated with RadiologyInfo.org with new organizations being added on a monthly basis. RadiologyInfo provides a tangible demonstration of how radiologists can engage directly with the global public to educate them on the value of radiology in their health care and to allay concerns and dispel misconceptions. Regular self-assessment and responsive planning will ensure its continued growth and relevance.”


    Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh 
Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • 
“However, participants expressed concerns that the language and images were too “doctor-centric” and expected a more “patient-centric” focus and reassuring tone. They expressed concerns about navigating and remaining oriented within the site and had difficulty interpreting some of the information categories. Participants requested 
that the site have a warmer look and feel, prioritization of topics of greatest interest to patients, more efficient access to content relevant to their queries, and integration of patient-friendly images and videos. Finally, they noted that RadiologyInfo.org did not always appear at the top of search results when participants generated their own search terms.”

    
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh 
Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • “To evolve the site further and improve its outreach, the committee has pursued an active social media campaign. Our efforts on social media are primarily through the two leading platforms, Facebook and Twitter. To date the site has garnered more than 240,000 likes on its Facebook page and more than 3,000 followers on Twitter. Social media platforms allow direct and real-time connections with patients, something a website cannot accomplish. As this aspect of RadiologyInfo evolves, care must be taken to ensure that responses are quick and vetted for appropriateness.”
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • “TAKE-HOME POINTS
    RadiologyInfo.org is an authoritative and trusted portal designed to support public care and public awareness of the essential role radiology in health care. 
-  Recent enhancements to the site have aimed to improve its usefulness for patients and their families. 
-  With more than 1.4 million visitors in August 2016 from 235 countries and territories worldwide, monthly engagement has grown by more than 60% from the prior year. 
-  Diversification of access through social media channels as well as mobile platforms has expanded the reach of RadiologyInfo.org.”
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press)
  • “At Saxbys, we recognized that the best team members for our business have the same three personal traits: they’re outgoing, detail oriented, and disciplined. Or, as we say, they’re “O.D.D.” Regard- less of their prior work experience, they must possess these three traits.”


    The Culture of Hospitality 
Nick Bayer, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR (in press) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2016.10.007
  • “We hire engaging people who embrace the importance of a positive human experience and accordingly believe in the business model with passion. As a result, our team members love the company and want to contribute to its overall quality.”


    The Culture of Hospitality 
Nick Bayer, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR (in press) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2016.10.007
  • Golden Rule: “Treat others the way you want to be treated.” 

    Platinum Rule: “Treat others the way they want to be treated.” 

    Double Platinum Rule: “Treat others the way they don’t even know they want to be treated.” 


    The Culture of Hospitality 
Nick Bayer, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR (in press) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2016.10.007
  • “Radiology departments need to be 
proactive to facilitate a positive experience for the patient. Patients who are referred to radiology begin their experience when they call to schedule the examination and complete the experi- ence when their physician explains the results of the test.” 


    The Culture of Hospitality 
Nick Bayer, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR (in press) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2016.10.007
  • “Careful selection of receptionists, radiology nurses, and technologists with these three skills is essential to running a department that provides a positive experience for a patient. Because of the intrinsic unpleasantries of any medical procedure, our staff needs to go above and beyond and embrace the Double Platinum Rule: “Treat others the way they don’t even know they want to be treated.” Anticipate patients’ needs and exceed their expectations.”

    
The Culture of Hospitality 
Nick Bayer, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR (in press) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2016.10.007
  • “Radiology residencies need to select medical students who are outgoing, detail-oriented, and disciplined and instill in trainees the importance of excellent customer service for their patients and ordering providers. Radiologists who welcome interaction, who are receptive to consultations, and who generate interpretations that effectively and efficiently guide patient management provide a positive experience for the referring providers. This is the business model that will ensure practice longevity as we transition to a value-based health care system.” 


    The Culture of Hospitality 
Nick Bayer, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Pamela T. Johnson
JACR (in press) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2016.10.007
  • What is your profile on Google?
  • “More than 85% of physicians in the United States use smart phones and 53% use tablets daily in their practice areas. There are four major app stores (iTunes, Google Play, Windows, and BlackBerry), but the majority of apps are offered through the iTunes and Google Play stores. In February 2015, the iTunes App Store contained approximately 32,000 medical mobile apps, whereas Google Play’s app store had about 23,000 medical apps. Medical apps fall under many different categories, including reference apps, such as the Physician’s Desk Reference app, medical calculators, and apps designed to access electronic health records or personal health information.” 


    Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists’ Training in Diagnostic Decision Making
Kim, Min Soon et al.
Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 335 - 343
  • “ Social media is defined as a ‘set of interactive technology tools designed to encourage social networking and dialogic communication in virtual communities and networks’. Social media platforms include online forums, networking sites, online professional networks, content posting sites and research forums . A recently published comprehensive analysis of social media encourages health care staff to embrace the ‘e-society’ and social media revolution as it has shown to provide improved outcomes for healthcare staff and patients.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EYA, Hoey ET
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “The revolution in social media enables radiologists to showcase their roles and responsibilities in the healthcare setting, and provides an interface to engage with patients and other healthcare members. Social media can therefore be a tool to improve patient education; this can be in the form of twitter feeds or health blogs tailored to discuss essential or topical issues in the media or local community .”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EYA, Hoey ET
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “From a patient perspective, the increased self-education through social media risks the possibility of becoming unnecessarily or inadequately concerned, due to lack of sufficient knowledge or contradicting information on social media; this can jeopardize patient safety especially if some patients use the social media as a replacement for traditional forms of consultation.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EYA, Hoey ET
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “The results show that 85 % of all survey participants are using social media, mostly for a mixture of private and professional reasons. Facebook is the most popular platform for general purposes, whereas LinkedIn and Twitter are more popular for professional usage. The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media.”


    Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “An increasing number of hospitals and health systems utilize social media to allow users to provide feedback and ratings. The correlation between ratings on social media and more conventional hospital quality metrics remains largely unclear, raising concern that healthcare consumers may make decisions on inaccurate or inappropriate information regarding quality.”


    Hospital Evaluations by Social Media: A Comparative Analysis of Facebook Ratings among Performance Outliers.
Glover M et al. 
J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Oct;30(10):1440-6
  • “Hospitals performing better than the national average on 30-day readmissions were more likely to use Facebook than lower-performing hospitals (93.3 % vs. 83.5 %; p < 0.01). The average rating for hospitals with low readmission rates (4.15 ± 0.31) was higher than that for hospitals with higher readmission rates (4.05 ± 0.41, p < 0.01). Major teaching hospitals were 14.3 times more likely to be in the high readmission rate group. A one-star increase in Facebook rating was associated with increased odds of the hospital belonging to the low readmission rate group by a factor of 5.0 (CI: 2.6-10.3, p <  0.01), when controlling for hospital characteristics and Facebook-related variables.”


    Hospital Evaluations by Social Media: A Comparative Analysis of Facebook Ratings among Performance Outliers.
Glover M et al. 
J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Oct;30(10):1440-6
  • “The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media. The survey results underline the need to increase radiologists' skills in using social media efficiently and safely. There is also a need to create clear guidelines regarding the online and social media presence of radiologists to maximize the potential benefits of engaging with social media.”

    
Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “ Hospitals with lower rates of 30-day hospital-wide unplanned readmissions have higher ratings on Facebook than hospitals with higher readmission rates. These findings add strength to the concept that aggregate measures of patient satisfaction on social media correlate with more traditionally accepted measures of hospital quality.”


    Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Online social media provides a platform for women to share their experiences and reactions in undergoing mammography, including humor, positive reflections, and encouragement of others to undergo the examination. Social media thus warrants further evaluation as a potential tool to help foster greater adherence to screening guidelines.”


    What Do Patients Tweet About Their Mammography Experience?
Rosenkrantz AB et al.
Acad Radiol. 2016 Nov;23(11):1367-1371.
  • “Identified themes included breast compression (24.4%), advising other patients to undergo screening (23.9%), recognition of the health importance of the examination (18.8%), the act of waiting (10.1%), relief regarding results (9.7%), reflection that the examination was not that bad (9.1%), generalized apprehension regarding the examination (8.2%), interactions with staff (8.0%), the gown (5.0%), examination costs or access (3.4%), offering or reaching out for online support from other patients (3.2%), perception of screening as a sign of aging (2.4%), and the waiting room or waiting room amenities (1.3%).”


    What Do Patients Tweet About Their Mammography Experience?
Rosenkrantz AB et al.
Acad Radiol. 2016 Nov;23(11):1367-1371.
  • “Patients are increasingly seeking online information regarding their health and their health care providers. Concurrently, more patients are accessing their electronic medical records, including their radiology reports, via online portals. Thus, this study aims to characterize what patients find when they search for radiologists online.”


    JOURNAL CLUB: Radiologists' Online Identities: What Patients Find When They Search Radiologists by Name.
Vijayasarathi A et al.
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2016 Nov;207(5):952-958.
  • “Of all U.S. health care providers recognized by CMS, 30,601 self-identified as radiologists. There was at least one search result for 30,600 radiologists (99.997%), for a total of 305,795 websites. Of all the domains, 69.8% were third party-controlled physician information systems, 17.7% were physician or institution controlled, 1.0% were social media platforms, 2.1% were other, and 9.5% were not classified. Nine of the top 10 most commonly encountered domains were commercially controlled third-party physician information systems.”


    JOURNAL CLUB: Radiologists' Online Identities: What Patients Find When They Search Radiologists by Name.
Vijayasarathi A et al.
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2016 Nov;207(5):952-958.
  • “Most U.S. radiologists lack self-controlled online content within the first page of Google search results. Opportunities exist for individual radiologists, radiology groups, academic departments, and professional societies to amend their online presence, control the content patients discover, and improve the visibility of the field at large.”


    JOURNAL CLUB: Radiologists' Online Identities: What Patients Find When They Search Radiologists by Name.
Vijayasarathi A et al.
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2016 Nov;207(5):952-958.
  • “Being prepared for any scenario is critical. Although there are situations in which we have many months to prepare for a project, there are also situations in which we have only a few hours to execute a project from start to finish. Clients recognize when you are (or aren’t) prepared for any eventuality, and it has a real impact on whether they are ready to trust you with their business in the future.”


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Ultimately, the result is letting our clients know that they are our priority, even while we are multitasking. We want to effectively convey to all of our clients the full confidence that they are our primary concern and focus of attention.”

    
The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Communication is key for my job as a marketer, as people won’t tell you answers to questions you don’t ask. Connecting with people, communi- cating effectively, and relating to others’ thoughts and ideas are invalu- able to success. Communication does not always require you to speak, but rather to listen. Listening allows you to comprehend others’ perspectives and also allows you to connect and understand them.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “It’s critical to understand your audience and the purpose of your business. Only when you are truly informed about your business and your clients can you effectively communicate, and that requires communication and research.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “No one gets to the top without a team. Be a team player. I wouldn’t be able to garner press or new business without every single other person at TAIT. It’s important to recognize your strengths and recog- nize the strengths of others. Most important, take time to inspire and be inspired by one another.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Passion about our business is what truly keeps me going on a daily basis. Keep setting goals, take time to appreciate your achievements, and don’t listen to the noise.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Just as Ms. Tinari does in her own business, we must take the time to talk with our clients, to learn what they like or don’t like about the ways in which we conduct our business, and treat them as customers. Our customers often have strong opinions about how we run our radiology businesses, and we must take the time to talk with them and learn how we can do better.”

    
The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “That stands in stark contrast to many radiology groups, whose physicians take great interest in the imaging part of their business but don’t take the time to learn about how things are going in other parts of the business (such as marketing, patient relations, nursing, etc). Radiologists are often blind to several very important facets of their own business, and this has the potential to be very dangerous to a practice’s long-term financial health.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • " Social media, including Facebook, Twitter, Blogger, Naver, and Reddit serves as a potential platform through which physicians can expand research efforts, promote health awareness, facilitate patient education, and communicate new research findings and best-practice guidelines. Because social media have become integrated into the lives of the millennial generation, medical educational materials need to be adapted to reach this generation of physicians, who are using it for information distribution and interaction."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • "Facebook is a potentially valuable educational tool for the generation that uses social media because it delivers information directly to users in a way to which they have become accustomed. When a user connects to a Facebook page, that page's posts are delivered to the user's personal page in real time, so that information is communicated directly to the user in a timely fashion, rather than the user having to search for new information."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • "Facebook has been embraced by medical professionals and medical institutions to promote health awareness, develop research projects, facilitate patient and student education, improve consultation and collaboration, increase disease awareness, and describe best-practice guidelines."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • "The millennial generation favors more technologically oriented teaching methods, and web-based
    delivery of information and educational materials will only grow as future physicians are exposed to technology at a young age. The information provided in this article could be valuable to medical educators and those who are in the process of or are considering developing an educational Facebook page."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • " Radiologists have been unwilling to directly discuss scan results with patients under the assumption that they might not understand what we are telling them. Bill Phillips's lecture has convinced us that our true customers are not other physicians ordering scans but rather the patients undergoing those scans, and,
    going forward, we must be willing to directly interact with those patients and convince them to partake of our radiologic services."
    The Men's Health Special Sauce: Ingredients Revealed
    Bill Phillips, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman,
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 351 - 353
  • "Just as the readership of Men's Health looks to the magazine for direct advice, we believe that patients will want to hear directly from their radiologists about what studies to undergo, the results of their examinations, and recom- mendations for follow-up. People increasingly want to take charge of their own health, and radiology practices willing to help patients do so might end up being more economically successful."

    The Men's Health Special Sauce: Ingredients Revealed
    Bill Phillips, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman,
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 351 - 353
  • "Dissatisfaction resulting from usability issues may cause physicians to resist using mobile apps for their education or training. The results of this study may be communicated to vendors to assist in the design of mobile education and training apps by highlighting the areas of difficulty radiologists are currently facing. These results could also inform the research and clinical community as evidence-based guidelines are created to help select mobile apps that will yield maximal educational and clinical benefits."

    Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists' Training in Diagnostic Decision Making
    Kim, Min Soon et al.
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 335 - 343
  • "More than 85% of physicians in the United States use smart phones and 53% use tablets daily in their practice areas. There are four major app stores (iTunes, Google Play, Windows, and BlackBerry), but the majority of apps are offered through the iTunes and Google Play stores. In February 2015, the iTunes App Store contained approximately 32,000 medical mobile apps, whereas Google Play's app store had about 23,000 medical apps. Medical apps fall under many different categories, including reference apps, such as the Physician's Desk Reference app, medical calculators, and apps designed to access electronic health records or personal health information."

    Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists' Training in Diagnostic Decision Making
    Kim, Min Soon et al.
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 335 - 343
  • “Social media is defined as a ‘set of interactive technology tools designed to encourage social networking and dialogic communication in virtual communities and networks’. Social media platforms include online forums, networking sites, online professional networks, content posting sites and research forums . A recently published comprehensive analysis of social media encourages health care staff to embrace the ‘e-society’ and social media revolution as it has shown to provide improved outcomes for healthcare staff and patients.”

    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EYA, Hoey ET
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “The revolution in social media enables radiologists to showcase their roles and responsibilities in the healthcare setting, and provides an interface to engage with patients and other healthcare members. Social media can therefore be a tool to improve patient education; this can be in the form of twitter feeds or health blogs tailored to discuss essential or topical issues in the media or local community .”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EYA, Hoey ET
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “From a patient perspective, the increased self-education through social media risks the possibility of becoming unnecessarily or inadequately concerned, due to lack of sufficient knowledge or contradicting information on social media; this can jeopardize patient safety especially if some patients use the social media as a replacement for traditional forms of consultation.”

    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EYA, Hoey ET
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “The results show that 85 % of all survey participants are using social media, mostly for a mixture of private and professional reasons. Facebook is the most popular platform for general purposes, whereas LinkedIn and Twitter are more popular for professional usage. The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media.”


    Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “An increasing number of hospitals and health systems utilize social media to allow users to provide feedback and ratings. The correlation between ratings on social media and more conventional hospital quality metrics remains largely unclear, raising concern that healthcare consumers may make decisions on inaccurate or inappropriate information regarding quality.”

    Hospital Evaluations by Social Media: A Comparative Analysis of Facebook Ratings among Performance Outliers.
Glover M et al. 
J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Oct;30(10):1440-6
  • “Hospitals performing better than the national average on 30-day readmissions were more likely to use Facebook than lower-performing hospitals (93.3 % vs. 83.5 %; p < 0.01). The average rating for hospitals with low readmission rates (4.15 ± 0.31) was higher than that for hospitals with higher readmission rates (4.05 ± 0.41, p < 0.01). Major teaching hospitals were 14.3 times more likely to be in the high readmission rate group. A one-star increase in Facebook rating was associated with increased odds of the hospital belonging to the low readmission rate group by a factor of 5.0 (CI: 2.6-10.3, p <  0.01), when controlling for hospital characteristics and Facebook-related variables.”

    Hospital Evaluations by Social Media: A Comparative Analysis of Facebook Ratings among Performance Outliers.
Glover M et al. 
J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Oct;30(10):1440-6
  • “The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media. The survey results underline the need to increase radiologists' skills in using social media efficiently and safely. There is also a need to create clear guidelines regarding the online and social media presence of radiologists to maximize the potential benefits of engaging with social media.”

    Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Hospitals with lower rates of 30-day hospital-wide unplanned readmissions have higher ratings on Facebook than hospitals with higher readmission rates. These findings add strength to the concept that aggregate measures of patient satisfaction on social media correlate with more traditionally accepted measures of hospital quality.”

    Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Potential benefits and opportunities of social media for Radiologists
    • Improvement of radiologists’ visibility among clinicians and patients
    • Increased interaction with clinicians regionally, nationally, and globally
    • Exchange and availability of relevant information and knowledge
    • Distribution and discussion of information and cases for education and research
  • Potential benefits and opportunities of social media for Radiologists
    • Sharing and discussion of radiological images with peers and clinicians
    • Increased impact and influence in the radiological community
    • More active engagement during scientific meetings (Tweetups, Tweet Chats)
    • Augmentation of the reach of scientific publications by promotion on SoMe
  • Potential benefits and opportunities of social media for Radiologists
    • Improvement of radiologists’ visibility among clinicians and patients

    Social media for radiologists: an introduction
    Erik R. Ranschaert et al.
    Insights Imaging (2015) 6:741–752
  • Potential benefits and opportunities of social media for Radiologists
    • Improvement of radiologists’ visibility among clinicians and patients

    Social media for radiologists: an introduction
    Erik R. Ranschaert et al.
    Insights Imaging (2015) 6:741–752
  • “Although many radiologists are already using social media, a large number of our colleagues are still unaware of the wide spectrum of useful information and interaction available via social media and of the added value these platforms can bring to daily practice.”

    Social media for radiologists: an introduction 
Erik R. Ranschaert et al. 
Insights Imaging (2015) 6:741–752
  • Purpose: “The goal of this study was to use patient reviews posted on Yelp.com, an online ratings website, to identify factors most commonly associated with positive versus negative patient perceptions of radiology imaging centers across the United States.”


    Factors Influencing Patients’ Perspectives of Radiology Imaging Centers: Evaluation Using an Online Social Media Ratings
Doshi AM et al.
J Am Coll Radiol 2015 (in press)
  • Methods: A total of 126 outpatient radiology centers from the 46 largest US cities were identified using Yelp.com; 1,009 patient reviews comprising 2,582 individual comments were evaluated. Comments were coded as pertaining to either the radiologist or other service items, and as expressing either a positive or negative opinion.


    Factors Influencing Patients’ Perspectives of Radiology Imaging Centers: Evaluation Using an Online Social Media Ratings
Doshi AM et al.
J Am Coll Radiol 2015 (in press)
  • Conclusions: Patients’ perception of radiology imaging centers is largely shaped by aspects of service quality. Schedulers, receptionists, technologists, and billers heavily influence patient satisfaction in radiology. Thus, radiologists must promote a service-oriented culture throughout their practice.”


    Factors Influencing Patients’ Perspectives of Radiology Imaging Centers: Evaluation Using an Online Social Media Ratings
Doshi AM et al.
J Am Coll Radiol 2015 (in press)
  • YELP 12-2-2015

  • 5 Stars

  • 5 Stars

  • “Over the past 5 years, social media have had a profound impact on the way doctors, patients, organizations, and even governments interact. Social media are interfaces through which individuals can create and share real-time news and information with others. They can flatten hierarchies, break down geographical boundaries, and provide access to a global network of healthcare professionals. A recently published comprehensive analysis of social media in the NHS encourages healthcare workers to fully embrace the social media revolution and realize the benefits for staff, patients, and their families.”


    Social media: the next frontier in Radiology
Patgiraja F et al.
Clinical Radiology 70(2015) 585-587
  • Web Site Ratings

  • www.cancercommons.org

  • Patient Driven Questions

  • Who are are users?
  • Use of Social Media in Medicine/Radiology
    - Education
    - Professional networking
    - Specialty awareness
    - Become a key person of influence
    - Assessing performance
    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “Social media has erased international and hierarchical boundaries thus raising awareness of important international education and research meetings. International radiology societies such as Radiology Society for North America (RSNA), British Institute of Radiology (BIR), Royal College of radiologists (RCR) and the ACR are increasingly embracing usage of social media tools such as Twitter to engage delegates, trainees and international collaborators; this has been shown to improve involvement, cohesion and collaboration amongst delegates. In addition at the international conferences discussions on the lectures and learning points are encouraged on twitter so that delegates and people who were not able to attend can benefit from the ongoing discussions.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “Social media has allowed people with specific interests in certain topics to become key people of influence on this topic by regular postings and involvement in online discussions in this topic area. This provides the environment where newspapers, magazines and TV researchers search for people who can meet journalists to discuss their work. Even an introverted person who finds it difficult in environments with lots of people can exert their knowledge and opinions and can start to direct a specific area within a speciality. It is strongly recommended to promote your research and ongoing learning on your social media so that people interested in your work connect with you and take interest in your work. It is no longer a requirement to be a professor to hold an important role amongst your peers in a certain topic area.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “The RCR in UK endeavors in its 2014-2016 strategy to increase awareness of the radiology awareness as a specialty. These ambitions are similar in other radiology organizations worldwide. The revolution in social media enables radiologists to showcase their roles and responsibilities in the healthcare setting, and provides an interface to engage with patients and other healthcare members. Social media can therefore be a tool to improve patient education; this can be in the form of twitter feeds or health blogs tailored to discuss essential or topical issues in the media or local community. This may increasingly provide valuable self-management insight and disease prevention for patients. In the context of radiology it could give them a better insight into the implications of radiation and how important imaging is to their diagnoses and ongoing management.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “Patients may find reassurance in social media by providing a knowledge library consistent with up to date evidence; a feature of social media, which is extremely beneficial in the management of chronic conditions. Social media also enables the opportunity to provide instant feedback serving as a tool to identify areas of improvement for the future. For patients, social media provides an environment for people with common problems to discuss these making the overall patient journey better with a reduction in the use of vital healthcare resources.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “In Europe the largest professional social networks are Linkedin and Xing. These create a borderless environment enabling interactions between global healthcare leaders, academics and clinicians. Groups are formed and global discussions on key issues in radiology can take place in real time. Social media also promotes exciting opportunities for innovation through collaboration with other specialties thus improving interdisciplinary relations. Radiologists are able to exchange ideas on an international scale enhancing the understanding of practice and challenges facing the field globally. These professional networks also allow radiologists to search for new training and working opportunities around the world. Furthermore, the social media tool research gate has improved access to open source research and has significantly improved the ease at which collaborations can be formed. In addition clinicians and scientists working on similar projects can share papers, data and ideas without being physically present at conferences.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “As more and more people use social media platforms for other forms of information, adopting social media as tools for personal health is only natural. Social media can play a critical role in patients’ taking charge of their own health because of its informational, emotional, and communicative value.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    JACR (in press) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2014.07.030
  • “Rather than allowing other physician specialties or random websites to set the terms of debate about the appropriateness of different imaging tests or the importance of radiologists’ role in patient care, social media may allow us to thrust ourselves back into the conversation.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    JACR (in press) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2014.07.030
  • “Using social media does carry with it the need for some caution: misuse can have major implications for both patient care and even your career. Inappropriate online behavior can potentially damage your personal integrity, the patient-doctor relationship, a doctor-colleague relationship, or opportunities for future employment.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    JACR (in press) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2014.07.030
  • “In addition, health care trends in general have shown a movement toward patient-centric models, as patients increasingly seek ways to take charge of their own health. As a result, patients are making increasing efforts to develop “trusted” networks they can rely on. The idea of “trusted” networks has evolved and no longer simply encompasses people whom they know in the real world but, increasingly, people and communities online whom they are confident turning to in times of need. It is imperative that hospitals and physicians work to be included in patients’ trusted networks both online and offline.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    JACR (in press) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2014.07.030
  • “Although the precision medicine initiative will probably yield its greatest benefits years down the road, there should be some notable near-term successes. In addition to the results of the cancer studies described above, studies of a large research cohort exposed to many kinds of therapies may provide early insights into pharmacogenomics — enabling the provision of the right drug at the right dose to the right patient. Opportunities to identify persons with rare loss of function mutations that protect against common diseases may point to attractive drug targets for broad patient populations. And observations of beneficial use of mobile health technologies may improve strategies for preventing and managing chronic diseases.”

    A New Initiative on Precision Medicine 
    Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., and Harold Varmus
    N Engl J Med 372;9
  • “Although cancers are largely a consequence of accumulating genomic damage during life, inherited genetic variations contribute to cancer risk, sometimes profoundly. This new understanding of oncogenic mechanisms has begun to influence risk assessment, diagnostic categories, and therapeutic strategies, with increasing use of drugs and antibodies designed to counter the influence of specific molecular drivers. Many targeted therapies have been (and are being) developed, and several have been shown to confer benefits, some of them spectacular. In addition, novel immunologic approaches have recently produced some profound responses, with signs that molecular signatures may be strong predictors of benefit.” 

    A New Initiative on Precision Medicine 
    Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., and Harold Varmus
    N Engl J Med 372;9
  • “ The future success of radiologists and their organizations demands embracing health care reform as an opportunity to re-evaluate their standard assumptions and existing approaches to delivering imaging services. Success in the new era of health care reform will require that radiologists redefine their mission and purpose, develop strategies for identifying and achieving their new goals, and implement new approaches to evaluate and track progress toward the achievement of those goals.”

    Strategic Planning and Radiology Practice Management in the New Health Care Environment
    Sharpe RE Jr et al.
    Radiographics. 2015 Jan-Feb;35(1):239-53
  • “To be successful, radiology groups will have to restructure their business practices and strategies to align with the emerging health care paradigm. This article outlines a four-stage strategic framework that has aided corporations in achieving their goals and that can be readily adapted and applied by radiologists. The four stages are (a) definition and articulation of a purpose, (b) clear definition of strategic goals, (c) prioritization of specific strategic enablers, and (d) implementation of processes for tracking progress and enabling continuous adaptation.”

    Strategic Planning and Radiology Practice Management in the New Health Care Environment
    Sharpe RE Jr et al.
    Radiographics. 2015 Jan-Feb;35(1):239-53
  • “Historically, radiologists competing in a fee-for-service environment have measured their business performance by using volume-based metrics (eg, numbers of diagnostic and interventional procedures performed, as a total and by modality) and revenue-based metrics (professional relative-value units, gross charges per full-time employee and by modality) . Previously, radiology managers’ notion of success was defined as yearly revenue growth, increase in the annual number of imaging examinations, and an increased rate of return on investment. In the new era of health care reform, these parameters are no longer adequate for measuring the success of radiology services.”

    Strategic Planning and Radiology Practice Management in the New Health Care Environment
    Sharpe RE Jr et al.
    Radiographics. 2015 Jan-Feb;35(1):239-53
  • “Social media is a broad term that describes the use of mobile and web- based devices to transform what was traditionally a one-way online conver- sation conducted via e-mail, older online forums, and instant messaging services into an open, two-way interactive dialogue.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “As more and more people use social media platforms for other forms of information, adopting social media as tools for personal health is only natural. Social media can play a critical role in patients’ taking charge of their own health because of its informational, emotional, and communicative value.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “In addition, health care trends in general have shown a movement toward patient-centric models, as patients increasingly seek ways to take charge of their own health. As a result, patients are making increasing efforts to develop “trusted” networks they can rely on.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “So, putting this all together, what do your patients want from social media with regard to physicians and hospitals? They want more meaningful conversations with their physicians and caregivers, the ability to quickly and proactively share and receive information with their health care providers, and the chance to strengthen their personal ownership in their health.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Ultimately, you need to care about social media because your patients and other health care providers care about social media. Patients want, and often expect, medical resources and providers to be available via social media. Building a positive online relationship with patients can help build a positive offline relationship and can potentially offset a negative one, thanks to the ability to respond to patients’ comments in a timely manner.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Using social media does carry with it the need for some caution: misuse can have major implications for both patient care and even your career. Inappropriate online behavior can potentially damage your personal integrity, the patient-doctor relation- ship, a doctor-colleague relationship, or opportunities for future employment.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
  • "Rather than allowing other physician specialties or random websites to set the terms of debate about the appropriateness of different imaging tests or the importance of radiologists’ role in patient care, social media may allow us to thrust ourselves back into the conversation. Social media might allow us to convey the importance of our specialty to patients in a direct way that we were never able to do when relying solely on face-to-face contact.”

    How Social Media Can Impact Medicine and Radiology.
    Zember WF, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]

 

  • “The large majority of content on Twitter was either unfavorable or concerned regarding CT radiation risk. Most articles were not peer-reviewed and were posted by no physicians; posts by physicians were largely by nonradiologists. More active engagement on Twitter by radiologists and physicists and increased dissemination of peer-reviewed articles may achieve a more balanced representation and alleviate concerns regarding CT radiation risk on social networks.”
    Imbalance of Opinions Expressed on Twitter Relating to CT Radiation Risk: An Opportunity for Increased Radiologist Representation.
    Prabhu V, Rosenkrantz AB
    AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Jan;204(1):W48-51 
  • “Two hundred twenty-seven tweets included user commentary regarding CT's benefit-to-risk ratio, of which 134 (59%) were unfavorable or concerned, 65 (29%) were neutral, 22 (10%) were informative regarding CT dose reduction strategies, and only 6 (3%) were favorable. Four hundred seventy-two tweets (76%) included links to a total of 99 unique articles, of which 25 (25%) were unfavorable or concerned, 10 (10%) were favorable, 25 (25%) were neutral, and 39 (39%) were informative regarding CT dose reduction. Article types were non-peer-reviewed medical sources (n = 50), lay press (n = 15), peer-reviewed medical journals (n = 13), blogs (n = 12), advertisements (n = 5), and informational websites (n = 4).”
    Imbalance of Opinions Expressed on Twitter Relating to CT Radiation Risk: An Opportunity for Increased Radiologist Representation.
    Prabhu V, Rosenkrantz AB
    AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Jan;204(1):W48-51
  • What are the potential negatives  in the use of social media in the hospital or medical center?
    “Most of the residents in radiation oncology use their smartphone to work in their department for a wide variety of tasks. However, the residents do not consistently check the validity of the apps that they use. Residents also use social networks, with only a limited impact on their relationship with their patients. Overall, this study highlights the irruption and the risks of new technologies in the clinical practice and raises the question of a possible regulation of their use in the hospital.”
    Mobile technology and social media in the clinical practice of young radiation oncologists: results of a comprehensive nationwide cross-sectional study
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2014 Sep 1;90(1):231-7
    Bibault JE et al.
  • PURPOSE: Social media and mobile technology are transforming the way in which young physicians are learning and practicing medicine. The true impact of such technologies has yet to be evaluated
    RESULTS: In all, 131 of 140 (93.6%) French young radiation oncologists answered the survey. Of these individuals, 93% owned a smartphone and 32.8% owned a tablet. The majority (78.6%) of the residents owning a smartphone used it to work in their department. A total of 33.5% had more than 5 medical applications installed. Only 60.3% of the residents verified the validity of the apps that they used. In all, 82.9% of the residents had a social network account
    Mobile technology and social media in the clinical practice of young radiation oncologists: results of a comprehensive nationwide cross-sectional study
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2014 Sep 1;90(1):231-7
    Bibault JE et al.
  • RESULTS: The use of Twitter microblogging increased by at least 30% by all identifiable meaningful metrics between the 2011 and 2012 RSNA annual meetings, including total tweets, tweets per day, activity of the most active microbloggers, and total number of microbloggers. Similar increases were observed in numbers of North American and international microbloggers.
    CONCLUSION: Markedly increased use of the Twitter microblogging platform at recent RSNA annual meetings demonstrates the potential to leverage this technology to engage meeting attendees, improve scientific sessions, and promote improved collaboration at national radiology meetings.
    Social media in radiology: early trends in Twitter microblogging at radiology's largest international meeting.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2014 Apr;11(4):387-90.
    Hawkins CM et al.
  • “Communication campaigns are an accepted method for altering societal attitudes, increasing knowledge, and achieving social and behavioral change particularly within public health and the social sciences. The Image Gently(SM) campaign is a national education and awareness campaign in radiology designed to promote the need for and opportunities to decrease radiation to children when CT scans are indicated.”
    Image Gently(SM): a national education and communication campaign in radiology using the science of social marketing.
    Goske MJ et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2008 Dec;5(12):1200-5.
  • “In this article, the relatively new science of social marketing is reviewed and the theoretical basis for an effective communication campaign in radiology is discussed. Communication strategies are considered and the type of outcomes that should be measured are reviewed. This methodology has demonstrated that simple, straightforward safety messages on radiation protection targeted to medical professionals throughout the radiology community, utilizing multiple media, can affect awareness potentially leading to change in practice.”
    Image Gently(SM): a national education and communication campaign in radiology using the science of social marketing.
    Goske MJ et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2008 Dec;5(12):1200-5.
  • “The increased prominence of electronic health records, email, mobile devices, and social media has transformed the health care environment by providing both physicians and patients with opportunities for rapid communication and knowledge exchange. However, these technological advances require increased attention to patient privacy under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).”
    HIPAA for physicians in the information age
    Kavoussi SC et al.
    Conn Med. 2014 Aug;78(7):425-7.
  • “Instant access to large amounts of electronic protected health information (PHI) merits the highest standard of network security and HIPAA training for all staff members. Physicians are responsible for protecting PHI stored on portable devices. Personal, residential, and public wireless connections are not certified with HIPAA-compliant Business Associate Agreements and are unsuitablefor PHI.”
    HIPAA for physicians in the information age
    Kavoussi SC et al.
    Conn Med. 2014 Aug;78(7):425-7.
  • “A professional and privacy-oriented approach to electronic communication, online activity, and social media is imperative to maintaining public trust in physician integrity. As new technologies are integrated into health care practice, the assurance of privacy will encourage patients to continue to seek medical care.”
    HIPAA for physicians in the information age
    Kavoussi SC et al.
    Conn Med. 2014 Aug;78(7):425-7.
  • “Serious consequences can result from lapses in best practice relating to social media behavior. Dedicated reflective learning modules need to be incorporated into undergraduate and postgraduate training programs as a matter of urgency.”
    Social media and tomorrow's medical students--how do they fit?
    Foley NM et al.
    J Surg Educ. 2014 May-Jun;71(3):385-90.
  • Social Media in Healthcare: Articles in 2014
    - Physical therapy
    - Dentistry
    - Radiology
  • “ Social media brings a new dimension to health care as it offers a medium to be used by the public, patients, and health professionals to communicate about health issues with the possibility of potentially improving health outcomes. Social media is a powerful tool, which offers collaboration between users and is a social interaction mechanism for a range of individuals.”
    A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication
    Moorhead SA et al
    J Med Internet Res. Apr 2013; 15(4): e85.
  • “The six key overarching benefits were identified as (1) increased interactions with others, (2) more available, shared, and tailored information, (3) increased accessibility and widening access to health information, (4) peer/social/emotional support, (5) public health surveillance, and (6) potential to influence health policy.”
    A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication
    Moorhead SA et al
    J Med Internet Res. Apr 2013; 15(4): e85.
  • “ Social media is changing the nature and speed of health care interaction between individuals and health organizations. The general public, patients, and health professionals are using social media to communicate about health issues. In the United States, 61% of adults search online and 39% use social media such as Facebook for health information .”
    A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication
    Moorhead SA et al
    J Med Internet Res. Apr 2013; 15(4): e85.
  • “The main recurring limitations of social media are quality concerns and the lack of reliability of the health information. The authors of websites are often unidentifiable, or there can be numerous authors, or the line between producer and audience is blurred. Thus it is more difficult for individuals to discern the reliability of information found online .”
    A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication
    Moorhead SA et al
    J Med Internet Res. Apr 2013; 15(4): e85.
  • “ Social media brings a new dimension to health care, offering a platform used by the public, patients, and health professionals to communicate about health issues with the possibility of potentially improving health outcomes. Although there are benefits to using social media for health communication, the information needs to be monitored for quality and reliability, and the users’ confidentiality and privacy need to be maintained.”
    A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication
    Moorhead SA et al
    J Med Internet Res. Apr 2013; 15(4): e85.
  • “According to a database of health care organizations actively using social media, over 1500 US hospitals now have a social media presence. In California alone, 105 hospitals sponsor 444 social media accounts that include 53 YouTube accounts, 89 Facebook accounts, 69 Twitter accounts, 39 LinkedIn accounts, 78 Four- square accounts, and 11 blogs.”
    Social Media and Public Outreach: A Physician Primer
    A. Radmanesh, R. Duszak, and R.T. Fitzgerald
    Am J Neuroradiol
    (in press) 
  • “The responsible use of social media provides golden opportunities for marketing physician services, as well as for contributing to public health by providing high quality on-line content that is both accurate and understandable to laypeople. Radiologists, for example, can leverage social media to help correct widespread and frequently publicized fear-generating myths regarding the risks of ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging.”
    Social Media and Public Outreach: A Physician Primer
    A. Radmanesh, R. Duszak, and R.T. Fitzgerald
    Am J Neuroradiol
    (in press) 
  • “Social media are new to many currently practicing physicians and that may generate anxiety. The avoidance of social media, however, does not protect us as professionals from our public. On the contrary, it constrains our on-line identity and cedes its control to nameless and often uninformed sources. We believe it is far better to be in control to the degree we can of what our patients, colleagues, and others find about us using search engines and other on-line tools. At the end of the day, as our on-line and real identities increasingly converge, they together define who we are in the eyes of others.”
    Social Media and Public Outreach: A Physician Primer
    A. Radmanesh, R. Duszak, and R.T. Fitzgerald
    Am J Neuroradiol
    (in press) 
  • According to a 2011 survey, 94% of medical students and 79.4% of residents in the United States are active on-line social media users.1 Social media represent a relatively simple technique to provide educational material in a format that is adapted to the learning styles preferred by the “millennial” generation.
    Social Media in Medical Education
    R.T. Fitzgerald et al.
    Am J Neuroradiol
  • “According to a 2011 survey, 94% of medical students and 79.4% of residents in the United States are active on-line social media users.1 Social media represent a relatively simple technique to provide educational material in a format that is adapted to the learning styles preferred by the “millennial” generation. “  Social Media in Medical Education
    R.T. Fitzgerald et al.
    Am J Neuroradiol (in press)
  • “According to a 2011 survey, 94% of medical students and 79.4% of residents in the United States are active on-line social media users.Social media represent a relatively simple technique to provide educational material in a format that is adapted to the learning styles preferred by the “millennial” generation.”
      Social Media in Medical Education
    R.T. Fitzgerald et al.
    Am J Neuroradiol (in press)
  • “In the coming years with the anticipated continuing shift of student preferences toward on-line content, increased interconnectivity, and peer-to-peer knowledge sharing, social media have the potential to substantially impact and disupt medical education.The radiology community would be well served by leading this charge.
      Social Media in Medical Education
    R.T. Fitzgerald et al.
    Am J Neuroradiol (in press)
  • “Despite evidence supporting the potential benefits of social media engagement for researchers, adoption of social media in academia has been slow. It is estimated that fewer than 3% of scientists are active Twitter users.A study to assess the prevalence of social media mentions in 1.4 million scholarly articles published between 2010 and 2012, fewer than 10% were tweeted at least once; however, the rate of tweets increased substantially over the 3-year study period from 2.4% in 2010 to 20.4% in 2012.”
    Social Media and Research Visibility
    Fitzgerald RT, Radmanesh A
    AJNR Am J Neuroradiol  (in press)
  • “The adoption of social media technologies appears to enhance clinical outcomes through improved communications. The ability of providers to more effectively, directly, and rapidly communicate among themselves as well as with patients should strengthen collaboration and treatment.“
    Clinical Social Networking—A New Revolution in Provider Communication and Delivery of Clinical Information across Providers of Care?
    Kolowitz BJ et al.
    J Digit Imaging (2014) 27:192–199
  • “ Unnecessary or extra communications oftentimes occur because current systems are designed to send information in one direction. This leaves the user wondering if the request were received and if the request is being acted on in a timely manner.”
     Clinical Social Networking—A New Revolution in Provider Communication and Delivery of Clinical Information Across Providers of Care?
    Kolowitz BJ et al.
    J Digit Imaging (2014) 27:192–199
  • “ The exponential growth, variety, and sophistication of the information communication technologies (ICTs) plus their growing accessibility are transforming how clinical practitioners, patients, and their families can work together. Social technologies are the ICTs tools that augment the ability of people to communicate and collaborate despite obstacles of geography and time.”
    Is there a role for social technologies in collaborative healthcare?
    Bacigalupe G.
    Fam Syst Health. 2011 Mar;29(1):1-14
  • “A note of caution is required: the phenomenon is complex and hard to describe in writing (a medium very different from the technologies themselves). Hardware and software are in continuous development and the iterative adaptation of the emergent social technologies for new forms of virtual communication.”
    Is there a role for social technologies in collaborative healthcare?
    Bacigalupe G.
    Fam Syst Health. 2011 Mar;29(1):1-14
  • “Technological innovations are rising rapidly and are inevitably becoming part of the health care environment. Patients frequently access Social media as a forum for discussion of personal health issues; and healthcare providers are now considering ways of harnessing social media as a source of learning and teaching. This review highlights some of the complex issues of using social media as an opportunity for interaction between public- patient-healthcare staff; considers the impact of self- education and self-management for patients with diabetes, and explores some recent advances in delivering education for staff. When using any information technology, the emphasis should rely on being assessed rigorously to show it promotes health education safely, can be recognized as delivering up-to- date health information effectively, and should ensure there is no bias in selective communication, or disadvantage to isolated patient groups.”
    Social media for diabetes health education - inclusive or exclusive?
    Pal BR.
    Curr Diabetes Rev. 2014;10(5):284-90
  • “Technological innovations are rising rapidly and are inevitably becoming part of the health care environment. Patients frequently access Social media as a forum for discussion of personal health issues; and healthcare providers are now considering ways of harnessing social media as a source of learning and teaching. This review highlights some of the complex issues of using social media as an opportunity for interaction between public- patient-healthcare staff; considers the impact of self- education and self-management for patients with diabetes, and explores some recent advances in delivering education for staff.”
    Social media for diabetes health education - inclusive or exclusive?
    Pal BR.
    Curr Diabetes Rev. 2014;10(5):284-90
  • “ When using any information technology, the emphasis should rely on being assessed rigorously to show it promotes health education safely, can be recognized as delivering up-to- date health information effectively, and should ensure there is no bias in selective communication, or disadvantage to isolated patient groups.”
    Social media for diabetes health education - inclusive or exclusive?
    Pal BR.
    Curr Diabetes Rev. 2014;10(5):284-90
  • Social Media and Patient Care: Thinking Differently
    - Can social media be used to recruit patients with rare diseases for a clinical trial or for follow up-
    - Can social media be used to recruit patients to be study participants-
  • “ Overall, social media outlets referred 84% of all responses, making it the dominant modality for recruiting the largest reported contemporary cohort of Fontan patients and patients who have PLE and PB. The methodology and response patterns from this study can be used to design research applications for other rare diseases.”
    Social Media Methods for Studying Rare Diseases
    Schumacher KR et al.
    Pediatrics 2014 Apr14 (Epub ahead of print)
  • “A total of 671 respondents with a Fontan palliation completed a valid survey, including 76 who had PLE and 46 who had PB. Responses over time demonstrated periodic, marked increases as new online populations of Fontan patients were reached. Of the responses, 574 (86%) were from the United States and 97 (14%) were international. The leading referral sources were Facebook, internet forums, and traditional websites.”
    Social Media Methods for Studying Rare Diseases
    Schumacher KR et al.
    Pediatrics 2014 Apr14 (Epub ahead of print)
  • “For pediatric rare diseases, the number of patients available to support traditional research methods is often inadequate. However, patients who have similar diseases cluster "virtually" online via social media. This study aimed to (1) determine whether patients who have the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis (PB) would participate in online research, and (2) explore response patterns to examine social media's role in participation compared with other referral modalities.”
    Social Media Methods for Studying Rare Diseases
    Schumacher KR et al.
    Pediatrics 2014 Apr14 (Epub ahead of print)
  • “The bulk of the observed contributions were not based on scientific results, but on various social media sources. These sources seem to contain mostly opinions and personal experience. A small group of people with distinct behavioral patterns played a core role in fuelling the discussion about CCSVI.”
    Sources of information and behavioral patterns in online health forums: qualitative study
    Sudau F et al.
    J Med Internet Res. 2014 Jan 14;16(1)
  • “Increasing numbers of patients are raising their voice in online forums. This shift is welcome as an act of patient autonomy, reflected in the term "expert patient". At the same time, there is considerable concern that patients can be easily misguided by pseudoscientific research and debate. Little is known about the sources of information used in health-related online forums, how users apply this information, and how they behave in such forums.”
    Sources of information and behavioral patterns in online health forums: qualitative study
    Sudau F et al.
    J Med Internet Res. 2014 Jan 14;16(1)
  •  “This observational study used the largest German multiple sclerosis (MS) online forum as a database, analyzing the user debate about the recently proposed and controversial Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) hypothesis. After extracting all posts and then filtering relevant CCSVI posts between 01 January 2008 and 17 August 2012, we first identified hyperlinks to scientific publications and other information sources used or referenced in the posts. Employing k-means clustering, we then analyzed the users' preference for sources of information and their general posting habits.”
    Sources of information and behavioral patterns in online health forums: qualitative study
    Sudau F et al.
    J Med Internet Res. 2014 Jan 14;16(1)
  •  “Of 139,912 posts from 11,997 threads, 8628 posts discussed or at least mentioned CCSVI. We detected hyperlinks pointing to CCSVI-related scientific publications in 31 posts. In contrast, 2829 different URLs were posted to the forum, most frequently referring to social media, such as YouTube or Facebook. We identified a total of 6 different roles of hyperlink posters including Social Media Fans, Organization Followers, and Balanced Source Users. Apart from the large and nonspecific residual category of the "average user", several specific behavior patterns were identified, such as the small but relevant groups of CCSVI-Focused Responders or CCSVI Activators.”
    Sources of information and behavioral patterns in online health forums: qualitative study
    Sudau F et al.
    J Med Internet Res. 2014 Jan 14;16(1)
  • “ Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here a case from local level health protection where the friend of an individual with meningococcal septicaemia used a social networking site to notify potential contacts.”
    Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality-
    Mandeville KL et al.
    Public Health Ethics. Apr 2014; 7(1): 47–50.
  • “There is a growing interest by public health organizations in the use of social media in the dissemination of health information, emergency preparedness and communicable disease control, particularly after the H1N1 influenza pandemic. For example, the World Health Organisation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Health Protection Agency (HPA) all have Twitter accounts, Facebook pages and videos on YouTube. The number of people following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s ‘emergency profile’ on Twitter increased from 65,000 to 1.2 million within a year, and the WHO used its Twitter account to issue advice in the wake of the 2011 Japanese earthquake.”
    Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality-
    Mandeville KL et al.
    Public Health Ethics. Apr 2014; 7(1): 47–50.
  • “ CDC has uploaded 243 videos to video-sharing site YouTube, and Shelly Diaz, a social media expert at the CDC, says social media are a key means of getting the agency’s message across to online visitors. For example, one CDC Facebook page is targeted at parents of teen drivers. “We spend a lot of time and we have a whole team of people working on social media. It's not investment free”, she says. “We need a message that can be nimble. Social media allow us to upload messages quickly.”
    Mixed uptake of social media among public health specialists
    Jones B
    Bull World Health Organ. Nov 1, 2011; 89(11): 784–785.
  • “Clearly, social media are changing the way people communicate not only in their day-to-day lives, but also during disasters that threaten public health. Engaging with and using emerging social media may well place the emergency-management community, including medical and public health professionals, in a better position to respond to disasters. The effectiveness of our public health emergency system relies on routine attention to preparedness, agility in responding to daily stresses and catastrophes, and the resilience that promotes rapid recovery. Social media can enhance each of these component efforts.”
    Integrating Social Media into Emergency-Preparedness Efforts
    Merchant RM et al.
    N Engl J Med 2011; 365:289-291
  • “Social media are also becoming vital to recovery efforts after crises, when infrastructure must be rebuilt and stress management is critical. The extensive reach of social networks allows people who are recovering from disasters to rapidly connect with needed resources. Tweets and photographs linked to timelines and interactive maps can tell a cohesive story about a recovering community's capabilities and vulnerabilities in real time. Organizations such as Ushahidi have helped with recovery in Haiti by matching volunteer health care providers with distressed areas. Social media have been used in new ways to connect responders and people directly affected by such disasters as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, flash floods in Australia, and the earthquake in New Zealand with medical and mental health services.”
    Integrating Social Media into Emergency-Preparedness Efforts
    Merchant RM et al.
    N Engl J Med 2011; 365:289-291
  • “ Furthermore, it is not always possible to know whether social media users are who they claim to be or whether the information they share is accurate. Although false messages that are broadcast widely are often rapidly corrected by other users, it is often difficult to separate real signals of a health crisis or a material need from background noise and opportunistic scams. Careful consideration must also be given to issues of privacy and the question of who should monitor data from social media (and for what).”
    Integrating Social Media into Emergency-Preparedness Efforts
    Merchant RM et al.
    N Engl J Med 2011; 365:289-291
  • “ We now live, learn, teach and practice medicine in the digital era. Social networking sites are used by at least half of all adults. Engagement with social media can be personal, professional, or both, for health-related and educational purposes. Use is often public. Lapses in professionalism can have devastating consequences, but when used well social media can enhance the lives of and learning by health professionals and trainees, ultimately for public good. Both risks and opportunities abound for individuals who participate, and health professionals need tips to enhance use and avoid pitfalls in their use of social media and to uphold their professional values.”
    Twelve tips for using social media as a medical educator
    Kind T et al.
    Medical Teacher 2014; 36:284-290
  • Twelve tips for using social media as a medical educator
    - Identify and then reflect upon your digital identity and goals for using social media
    - Select a tool based upon goals and the strength of platforms available to support educational activities
    - Observe and establish comfort first. Think, then contribute
    - Make some initial connections and tap into the power of a community
  • Twelve tips for using social media as a medical educator
    - Know and apply existing social media guidelines for the responsible use of social media
    - Develop individual guiding principles with which you are comfortable
    - Keep all patient information private
    - Handling ‘‘friend’’ requests from trainees: Know your options and their consequences
  • Twelve tips for using social media as a medical educator
    - Share credible information: disseminate evidence based health information, enhancing public health
    - Engage, learn, reflect, and teach
    - Research: Advance your academic productivity by expanding your professional network
    - Mentor and be mentored: demonstrate responsible social media use
  • The downside of Social Media: Errors are Magnified and Last Forever
  • OBJECTIVE:
    To investigate potential violations of patient confidentiality or other breaches of medical ethics committed by physicians and medical students active on the social networking site Twitter.
    RESULTS:
    In all, 237 Twitter accounts were established as held by physicians and medical students and a total of 13 780 tweets were analysed by content. In all, 276 (1.9%) tweets were labelled as 'unprofessional'. Among these, 26 (0.2%) tweets written by 15 (6.3%) physicians and medical students included information that could violate patient privacy. No information on the personal ID number or names was disclosed, but parts of the patient documentation or otherwise specific indicatory information on patients were found. Unprofessional tweets were more common among users writing under a pseudonym and among medical students.
    “ In this study of physicians and medical students on Twitter, we observed potential violations of patient privacy and other breaches of medical ethics. Our findings underline that every physician and medical student has to consider his or her presence on social networking sites. It remains to be investigated if the introduction of social networking site guidelines for medical professionals will improve awareness.”
    Virtual colleagues, virtually colleagues—physicians’ use of Twitter: a population-based observational study
     Brynolf  A et al.
    BMJ Open. 2013; 3(7): e002988.
  •  “Although it is clear that some clinicians use social networks in their professional activities and respect for privacy is of concern to everyone, whether social media will become a critical part of healthcare or remain an ‘adjunct’ technology is still unclear. There are several examples in which technology that would seem to be justifiably needed (eg, personal health records) has not yet become fully adopted. Social media in the clinical context may fall into this category. It will take several years to understand the effects of social media in clinician behavior and on patient outcomes.”
    Reviewing social media use by clinicians
    von Muhlen M, Ohno-Machado L
    J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2012 Sep-Oct; 19(5): 777–781.
  •  “Social media use by clinicians is widespread, especially by younger clinicians for personal and reference purposes. Awareness and interest is evident across multiple disciplines, as are concerns regarding the potential for misuse. Efforts to quantify the impact of social media are in their infancy, as demonstrated by the lack of widely used terminology and research methods. Further studies are necessary to characterize use better, define training requirements, and discover what, if any, uses for social media will be appropriate in clinical training.”
    Reviewing social media use by clinicians
    von Muhlen M, Ohno-Machado L
    J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2012 Sep-Oct; 19(5): 777–781.
  • “ The advent of social networking as a major platform for human interaction has introduced a new dimension into the physician-patient relationship, known as Health 2.0. The concept of Health 2.0 is young and evolving; so far, it has meant the use of social media by health professionals and patients to personalize health care and promote health education. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter offer promising platforms for health care providers to engage patients. Despite the vast potential of Health 2.0, usage by health providers remains relatively low.”
    Health 2.0--Lessons Learned: Social Networking With Patients for Health Promotion.
    Sharma S et al.
    J Prim Care Community Health. 2014 Feb 11. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “ In a changing healthcare environment, patient loyalty has never been more important. However, creating patient loyalty can mean more than providing quality health services within the four walls of the medical office. With patients turning to online sources and social media in search of advice and a better patient experience, we must now ensure that patients have meaningful engagements with us across the continuum of care, from the phone, to the office, to social media tools like Facebook and YouTube as we look to build loyalty and grow our referral volumes.”
    Patient loyalty and the social media effect.
    Verkamp J
    J Med Pract Manage. 2013 Sep-Oct;29(2):96-8.
  • “ As the Internet has matured, social media has developed and become a part of our everyday life. Whether it is Facebook, YouTube, or LinkedIn, we now communicate with each other and the world in a very different manner. As physicians, and specifically colon and rectal surgeons, it is important that we understand this new technology, learn its limitations, and utilize it to foster growth of our practice, trade, and potentially result in better patient care.”
    Social Media and the Surgeon
    Margolin DA
    Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2013 Mar;26(1):36-38.
  • “Twitter has over 600 million registered users, and results in over 300 million “Tweets” each day.LinkedIn, a social media site geared toward professionals, has over 77 million users.Doximity, a physician-only social network started in 2011 where physicians can use their real name, contact others, and verify credentials has over 50,000 active physicians and is now used by 9% of all doctors in the United States.On YouTube, there are 48 hours of video uploaded every minute–this equals nearly 8 years of content uploaded every day.For many of the “holdouts” on the social media stage, the numbers left behind seem to be rapidly waning.”
    Social Media and the Surgeon
    Margolin DA
    Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2013 Mar;26(1):36-38.
  • “Health care organizations have recognized the importance of social media with the goal of improving outcomes, reducing costs, and improving coordination of care. In 2011, U.S. hospitals had 1,068 Facebook pages, 8,154 Twitter accounts, 566 LinkedIn accounts, 575 YouTube Channels, and 149 Blogs.Hospitals have long recognized that patients will turn to the Internet and social media sites to research their conditions, doctors, and hospitals.”
    Social Media and the Surgeon
    Margolin DA
    Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2013 Mar;26(1):36-38.
  • “Other examples of hospitals using social media to improve patient experience are as follows: The Cleveland Clinic monitors Facebook and Twitter and uses these to address patient complaints in a timely fashion; Seattle Children's Hospital shared it condolences and apologies for an error that the led to a child's death and publicized the steps taken to prevent future errors on their Facebook page; and the Ochsner Clinic in New Orleans contacts patients via Smartphone apps with the up-to-date wait times at the various emergency rooms.”
    Social Media and the Surgeon
    Margolin DA
    Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2013 Mar;26(1):36-38.
  • “The adoption of social media technologies appears to enhance clinical outcomes through improvedcommunications as reported by Bacigalupe (Fam Syst Heal 29(1):1-14, 2011). The ability of providers to more effectively, directly, and rapidly communicate among themselves as well as with patients should strengthen collaboration and treatment as reported by Bacigalupe.”
    Clinical Social Networking—A New Revolution in Provider
    Communication and Delivery of Clinical Information
    across Providers of Care-
    Kolowitz BJ et al.
    J Digit Imaging (2014) 27:192-199
  • “Despite a proliferation of apps that let people monitor every movement and morsel they eat, information technology has yet to revolutionize health care the way it has upended, say, shopping. What the upstarts lack in scale (for now), they more than make up for in utility. Imagine joining an online global community of people with the same rare disorder, or finding a doctor on the basis of detailed patient reviews. Facebook may provide its fans with tools they love, but this new wave of social networks offers tools that its users can't live without -- in some cases literally.”
    Social media comes to health care.
    Fortune. 2013 Apr 29;167(6):52, 54.
    Bradley R
  • “Twitter is a social media microblogging platform that allows rapid exchange of information between individuals. Despite its widespread acceptance and use at various other medical specialty meetings, there are no published data evaluating its use at radiology meetings. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the use of Twitter as a microblogging platform at recent RSNA annual meetings.”
    Social Media in Radiology: Early Trends in Twitter Microblogging at Radiology's Largest International Meeting
    Hawkins CM et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol 2014 Apr 11(4)387-390
  • “The use of Twitter microblogging increased by at least 30% by all identifiable meaningful metrics between the 2011 and 2012 RSNA annual meetings, including total tweets, tweets per day, activity of the most active microbloggers, and total number of microbloggers. Similar increases were observed in numbers of North American and international microbloggers.”
    Social Media in Radiology: Early Trends in Twitter Microblogging at Radiology's Largest International Meeting
    Hawkins CM et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol 2014 Apr 11(4)387-390
  • “Markedly increased use of the Twitter microblogging platform at recent RSNA annual meetings demonstrates the potential to leverage this technology to engage meeting attendees, improve scientific sessions, and promote improved collaboration at national radiology meetings.”
    Social Media in Radiology: Early Trends in Twitter Microblogging at Radiology's Largest International Meeting
    Hawkins CM et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol 2014 Apr 11(4)387-390
  • “ PURPOSE: Social media have become established as tools for rapid information dissemination to a broad audience. A major use has been the compilation of conference-specific messaging, known as 'tweets', via pre-selected 'hashtags' on Twitter. We analyzed Twitter use between consecutive years at the annual meetings of the American (AUA) and Canadian Urological Association (CUA) annual meetings.”
    The Dramatic Rise of Social Media in Urology: Trends in Twitter Use at the American and Canadian Urological Association Annual Meetings in 2012 and 2013.
    Matta R et al.
    J Urol 2014 Feb 24 (epub ahead of press)
  • “There was a large increase in Twitter use at the 2013 annual meetings (4591 tweets from 540 accounts) over the 2012 meetings (811 tweets from 134 accounts). Biotechnology analysts published the highest volume of tweets (226; 28%) in 2012; this majority shifted to urologists in 2013 (2765 tweets; 60%). In 2012, 29% were categorized as informative; this proportion increased to 41% at the 2013 meetings.”
    The Dramatic Rise of Social Media in Urology: Trends in Twitter Use at the American and Canadian Urological Association Annual Meetings in 2012 and 2013.
    Matta R et al.
    J Urol 2014 Feb 24 (epub ahead of press)
  • “Twitter has emerged as a significant communication platform at urological meetings, and its use increased dramatically between 2012 and 2013. Urologists have increasingly led this discussion with an increased focus on data arising from meeting proceedings. This adjunct to traditional meeting activity merits the attention of urologists and of the professional associations that host such meetings.”
    The Dramatic Rise of Social Media in Urology: Trends in Twitter Use at the American and Canadian Urological Association Annual Meetings in 2012 and 2013.
    Matta R et al.
    J Urol 2014 Feb 24 (epub ahead of press)
  • “Health care lags behind other industries in engaging with customers via social networking. In part, this reflects concerns regarding health information privacy concerns, organizational fears regarding employee time mismanagement, and the real challenge that health care providers face with multiple and competing demands on time. Despite these fears and concerns, our patients are spending more and more of their time online seeking health care information, more often in social networks. Our greatest capacity for health care change management at present may well center on our strategic capacity to meet our patients where they spend the majority of their time online.”
    The shape of digital engagement: health care and social media.
    Timimi FK
    J Ambul Care Manage. 2013 Jul-Sep;36(3):187-92.
  • “The majority of Internet reviews of primary care physicians are positive in nature. Our findings reaffirm that the care encounter extends beyond the patient-physician dyad; staff, access, and convenience all affect patient's reviews of physicians. In addition, negative interpersonal reviews underscore the importance of well-perceived bedside manner for a successful patient-physician interaction.”
    What patients say about their doctors online: a qualitative content analysis
    Lopez A et al.
    J Gen Intern Med. 2012 Jun;27(6):685-92.
  • “Social media includes many different forms of technology including online forums, blogs, microblogs (i.e. Twitter), wikipedias, video blogs, social networks and podcasting. The use of social media has grown exponentially and time spent on social media sites now represents one in five minutes spent online. Concomitant with this online growth, there has been an inverse trajectory in direct face-to-face patient-provider moments, which continue to become scarcer across the spectrum of health care.”
    Medicine, morality and health care social media.
    Timimi FK
    BMC Med. 2012 Aug 2;10:83
  • “In contrast to standard forms of engagement and education, social media has advantages to include profound reach, immediate availability, an archived presence and broad accessibility. Our opportunity as health care providers to partner with our patients has never been greater, yet all too often we allow risk averse fears to limit our ability to truly leverage our good content effectively to the online community. This risk averse behavior truly limits our capacity to effectively engage our patients where they are online.”
    Medicine, morality and health care social media.
    Timimi FK
    BMC Med. 2012 Aug 2;10:83
  • “ Our opportunity as health care providers to partner with our patients has never been greater, yet all too often we allow risk averse fears to limit our ability to truly leverage our good content effectively to the online community. This risk averse behavior truly limits our capacity to effectively engage our patients where they are online.”
    Medicine, morality and health care social media.
    Timimi FK
    BMC Med. 2012 Aug 2;10:83
  • RadiologyInfo.org
    - Mission Statement
    - RadiologyInfo™ is the public information website developed and funded by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). It was established to inform and educate the public about radiologic procedures and the role of radiologists in healthcare, and to improve communications between physicians and their patients.
  • Top 10 Facebook Friends
  • “ Markedly increased use of the Twitter microblogging platform at recent RSNA annual meetings demonstrates the potential to leverage this technology to engage meeting attendees, improve scientific sessions, and promote improved collaboration at national meetings.”
    Social Media in Radiology: Early Trends in Twitter Microblogging at Radiology’s Largest International Meeting
    Hawkins CM et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol 2013 (in press)
  • “ The use of Twitter microblogging increased by at least 30% by all identifiable meaningful metric between the 2011 and 2012 RSNA annual meetings, including total tweets, tweets per day, activity of the most active microbloggers and total number of microbloggers.”
    Social Media in Radiology: Early Trends in Twitter Microblogging at Radiology’s Largest International Meeting
    Hawkins CM et al.
    J Am Coll Radiol 2013 (in press)
  • Twitter
    - Microblogging platform
    - Posts are 140 characters of less
    - Allows user to share short messages, information and links
    - You need to follow the “blogger” to see the posts and they may then be sent from user to user (and when successful the term is “going viral”
    - Hashtags (#RSNA2013) can keep all info on a topic/event in one place
  • What this means for patients
    - Healthcare trends show a movement to a patient-centric mod
    - Patients want, and in some cases expect, physicians to be available on social media
    - At the same time, physicians are being cautioned by medical organizations about how to use social media -- if you dare to use it, that is
    - Patients expect physicians using social media with patients to be professional and respect both their privacy and your own
  • What this means for hospitals/physicians
    - You need a  plan of what, when, and how social media will be used by your hospital/practice
    - Once you open accounts and start your campaigns you must keep them active with current and relevant information
    - Do not expect immediate results, be prepared for a commitment
    - Review and edit your hospital/practice policies to reflect the use of social media
    - Remember: You can’t always take back what has been posted and seen
    - Always keep in mind privacy and HIPAA compliance
  • The top social networks for medical professionals: What are they-
    - Twitter: Online social networking and microblogging service that enables users to send and read "tweets", which are text messages limited to 140 characters
    - Great For: Quick, focused chats with people you know, don’t know, or may hardly know. It’s great for making new contacts, developing new business relationships, and generally creating a first stage of contact.
    - Facebook: A popular free social networking website that allows registered users to create profiles, upload photos and video, send messages and keep in touch with friends, family and colleagues
    - Great For: Staying in touch with friends and family and sharing content such as photos or updates on your life.
    - LinkedIn: A social networking site designed specifically for professional networking, connecting with your peers, people you'd like to work with (including clients/ suppliers for those in business themselves) community
    - Great For: Connecting to people key to your business, as well as giving potential clients the opportunity to find and learn more about you
    - Blog: (short for weblog) is a personal online journal that is frequently updated and intended for general public
    - Great For: Showcasing your business and expertise; This is your platform, you provide the content, you control the platform, you moderate the comments, you create the traffic
  • Mobile Devices are the Common Thread
  • What is Facebook-
    - Facebook is a popular free social networking website that allows registered users to create profiles, upload photos and video, send messages and keep in touch with friends, family and colleagues. The site, which is available in 37 different languages, includes public features such as:
    - Marketplace - allows members to post, read and respond to classified ads.
    - Groups - allows members who have common interests to find each other and interact.
    - Events  - allows members to publicize an event, invite guests and track who plans to attend.
    - Pages - allows members to create and promote a public page built around a specific topic.
    - Presence technology - allows members to see which contacts are online and chat.
  • What is Facebook-
    - The name of a social networking site (SNS) that connects people with friends and others who work, study and live around them. People use Facebook to keep in touch with friends, post photos, share links and exchange other information. Facebook users can see only the profiles of confirmed friends and the people in their networks.
    - Webopedia Computer Dictionary
    “Facebook's mission is to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.”
  • Facebook’s home page
  • Facebook User Numbers
  • “ Despite the potential drawbacks, social media have become ubiquitous, such that individuals, practices and departments should develop strategies for developing and maintaining a social media presence.”
    Social Media for Professional Purposes: Introduction to the JACR “How to” Video Guide
    Naeger DM, Webb EM
    JACR 2013;10:736-737
  • Why have radiologists been slow to embrace “Social Media” to extend their practices-
    - Concerns about professionalism
    - Concerns about privacy for our patients (HIPPA violations)
    - Concern over control (or lack of control) of the message
    - Concern for who will be responsible internally for developing and managing the website including how to pay for it
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 1 million — End of 2004.
    - 5.5 million — End of 2005.
    - 12 million — End of 2006.
    - 20 million — April 2007.
    - 50 million — October 2007.
    - 100 million — August 2008.
    - 150 million — January 2009.
    - 175 million — February 2009.
    - 200 million — April 2009.
    - 250 million — July 2009.
    - 300 million — September 2009.
    - 350 million — End of 2009.
    - 400 million — February 2010.
    - 500 million — July 2010.
    - 608 million — End of 2010.
    - 750 million — July 2011.
    - 800 million — September 2011.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
    - 901 million — March 2012.
    - 955 million — June 2012.
    - 1.01 billion — September 2012.
    - 1.06 billion — December 2012.
    - 1.11 billion — March 2013.
    - Source: Facebook Inc.
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 250 million — July 2009.
    - 300 million — September 2009.
    - 350 million — End of 2009.
    - 400 million — February 2010.
    - 500 million — July 2010.
    - 608 million — End of 2010.
    - 750 million — July 2011.
    - 800 million — September 2011.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 750 million — July 2011.
    - 800 million — September 2011.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
    - 901 million — March 2012.
    - 955 million — June 2012.
    - 1.01 billion — September 2012.
    - 1.06 billion — December 2012.
    - 1.11 billion — March 2013.
    - Source: Facebook Inc.
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 1 million — End of 2004.
    - 5.5 million — End of 2005.
    - 12 million — End of 2006.
    - 50 million — October 2007.
    - 100 million — August 2008.
    - 150 million — January 2009.
    - 350 million — End of 2009.
    - 608 million — End of 2010.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
    - 1.06 billion — December 2012.
  •  “The CT Contrast Protocols application for the iPad and iPhone is one of the first radiology applications in the Apple App Store to focus on radiology education and was designed to address the lack of practical information on contrast media for radiologists, technologists, nurses, and trainees.”
     CT Contrast Protocols Application for the iPad: New Resource for Technologists, Nurses, and Radiologists
    Raman SP, Raminpour S, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    RadioGraphics 2013; 33:913-921
  • “The developers of the application thought that providing the user with specific questions and answers could be more practically useful on a day-to-day basis than a larger amount of text or information.”
     CT Contrast Protocols Application for the iPad: New Resource for Technologists, Nurses, and Radiologists
    Raman SP, Raminpour S, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    RadioGraphics 2013; 33:913-921
  •  “ We believe that this application, in addition to its educational value, is a clear illustration of the unlimited possibilities that exist in the mobile sphere, particularly on the iPad and iPhone, for radiology educational resource .”
     CT Contrast Protocols Application for the iPad: New Resource for Technologists, Nurses, and Radiologists
    Raman SP, Raminpour S, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    RadioGraphics 2013; 33:913-921
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