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3D and Workflow: Social Media Imaging Pearls - Learning Modules | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ 3D and Workflow ❯ Social Media

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  • “As the organ shortage continues to grow, the creation of social media communities by transplant centers and the public is rapidly expanding to increase the number of living donors. Social media communities are arranged in myriad ways, and without standardization, raising concerns about potential recipients' and potential donors' autonomy and quality of care. Social media communities magnify and modify extant ethical issues in deceased and living donation related to privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and informed consent, and increase the potential for undue influence and coercion for potential living donors and transplant candidates. Currently, no national ethical guidelines have been developed in the U.S. regarding the use of social media to foster organ transplantation. We provide an ethical framework to guide transplant stakeholders in using social media for public and patient communication about transplantation and living donation, and offer recommendations for transplant clinical practice and future research.”


    Social Media and Organ Donation: Ethically Navigating the Next Frontier.
Henderson ML et al.
Am J Transplant. 2017 Jul 25. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14444. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “As the organ shortage continues to grow, the creation of social media communities by transplant centers and the public is rapidly expanding to increase the number of living donors. Social media communities are arranged in myriad ways, and without standardization, raising concerns about potential recipients' and potential donors' autonomy and quality of care. Social media communities magnify and modify extant ethical issues in deceased and living donation related to privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and informed consent, and increase the potential for undue influence and coercion for potential living donors and transplant candidates. Currently, no national ethical guidelines have been developed in the U.S. regarding the use of social media to foster organ transplantation.”


    Social Media and Organ Donation: Ethically Navigating the Next Frontier.
Henderson ML et al.
Am J Transplant. 2017 Jul 25. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14444. [Epub ahead of print]
  • “Cancer patients and their caregivers are increasingly using social media as a platform to share cancer experiences, connect with support, and exchange cancer-related information. Yet, little is known about the nature and scientific accuracy of cancer-related information exchanged on social media. We conducted a content analysis of 12 months of data from 18 publically available Facebook Pages hosted by parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (N = 15,852 posts) and extracted all exchanges of medically-oriented cancer information. We systematically coded for themes in the nature of cancer-related information exchanged on personal Facebook Pages and two oncology experts independently evaluated the scientific accuracy of each post.” 

    
Is Cancer Information Exchanged on Social Media Scientifically Accurate?
Gage-Bouchard EA et al.
J Cancer Educ. 2017 Jul 19. doi: 10.1007/s13187-017-1254-z. [Epub ahead of print
  • “Of the 15,852 total posts, 171 posts contained medically-oriented cancer information. The most frequent type of cancer information exchanged was information related to treatment protocols and health services use (35%) followed by information related to side effects and late effects (26%), medication (16%), medical caregiving strategies (13%), alternative and complementary therapies (8%), and other (2%). Overall, 67% of all cancer information exchanged was deemed medically/scientifically accurate, 19% was not medically/scientifically accurate, and 14% described unproven treatment modalities. These findings highlight the potential utility of social media as a cancer-related resource, but also indicate that providers should focus on recommending reliable, evidence-based sources to patients and caregivers.” 


    Is Cancer Information Exchanged on Social Media Scientifically Accurate?
Gage-Bouchard EA et al.
J Cancer Educ. 2017 Jul 19. doi: 10.1007/s13187-017-1254-z. [Epub ahead of print
  • “The health care industry has recognized the importance of the patient experience. We believe that the biggest driver of patient experience is medical staff experience. If we want to increase patient experience, we must first improve the experience of the medical staff and providers.”


    Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “What we found through our work with hospitals around the country is that when patients walk into a hospital where each department is color coded by group, the hospital logo is embroidered on every top, and all the scrubs and laboratory coats are well fitted and pressed, it changes how they think about the institution. From the patients’ perspective, they trust the doctors and nurses, and their opinions of the providers’ performance improve exponentially.”

    
Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “Many patients are visiting your department for the first time. Their confidence in the quality of the care you deliver will be influenced by the appearance of your physicians, house staff, nurses, and technologists. Making sure the “uniform” is a quality presentation may improve patients’ perceptions of your department’s and institution’s quality. The proper dress code may have positive unintended consequences. On the other hand, if the point of contact to the providing care team is poorly dressed (ie, wrinkled or poorly fitting scrubs), patients may 
become concerned about the entire operation.”

    
Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • ”RadiologyInfo.org is a public information portal designed to support patient care and broaden public awareness of the essential role radiology plays in overall patient health care. Over the past 14 years, RadiologyInfo.org has evolved considerably to provide access to more than 220 mixed-media descriptions of tests, treatments, and diseases through a spectrum of mobile and desktop platforms, social media, and downloadable documents in both English and Spanish. In 2014, the RSNA-ACR Public Information Website Committee, which stewards RadiologyInfo.org, developed 3- to 5-year strategic and implementation plans for the website. The process was informed by RadiologyInfo.org user surveys, formal stakeholder interviews, focus groups, and usability testing.”

    
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh 
Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • 
“Over the past year, visits to RadiologyInfo.org have increased by 60.27% to 1,424,523 in August 2016 from 235 countries and territories. Twenty-two organizations have affiliated with RadiologyInfo.org with new organizations being added on a monthly basis. RadiologyInfo provides a tangible demonstration of how radiologists can engage directly with the global public to educate them on the value of radiology in their health care and to allay concerns and dispel misconceptions. Regular self-assessment and responsive planning will ensure its continued growth and relevance.”


    Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh 
Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • 
“However, participants expressed concerns that the language and images were too “doctor-centric” and expected a more “patient-centric” focus and reassuring tone. They expressed concerns about navigating and remaining oriented within the site and had difficulty interpreting some of the information categories. Participants requested 
that the site have a warmer look and feel, prioritization of topics of greatest interest to patients, more efficient access to content relevant to their queries, and integration of patient-friendly images and videos. Finally, they noted that RadiologyInfo.org did not always appear at the top of search results when participants generated their own search terms.”

    
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh 
Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • “To evolve the site further and improve its outreach, the committee has pursued an active social media campaign. Our efforts on social media are primarily through the two leading platforms, Facebook and Twitter. To date the site has garnered more than 240,000 likes on its Facebook page and more than 3,000 followers on Twitter. Social media platforms allow direct and real-time connections with patients, something a website cannot accomplish. As this aspect of RadiologyInfo evolves, care must be taken to ensure that responses are quick and vetted for appropriateness.”
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press) 

  • “TAKE-HOME POINTS
    RadiologyInfo.org is an authoritative and trusted portal designed to support public care and public awareness of the essential role radiology in health care. 
-  Recent enhancements to the site have aimed to improve its usefulness for patients and their families. 
-  With more than 1.4 million visitors in August 2016 from 235 countries and territories worldwide, monthly engagement has grown by more than 60% from the prior year. 
-  Diversification of access through social media channels as well as mobile platforms has expanded the reach of RadiologyInfo.org.”
Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org 
Geoffrey D. Rubin, Arun Krishnaraj, Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ramji R. Rajendran, Elliot K. Fishman
J Am Coll Radiol 2017 (in press)
  • “Being prepared for any scenario is critical. Although there are situations in which we have many months to prepare for a project, there are also situations in which we have only a few hours to execute a project from start to finish. Clients recognize when you are (or aren’t) prepared for any eventuality, and it has a real impact on whether they are ready to trust you with their business in the future.”


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Ultimately, the result is letting our clients know that they are our priority, even while we are multitasking. We want to effectively convey to all of our clients the full confidence that they are our primary concern and focus of attention.”

    
The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Communication is key for my job as a marketer, as people won’t tell you answers to questions you don’t ask. Connecting with people, communi- cating effectively, and relating to others’ thoughts and ideas are invalu- able to success. Communication does not always require you to speak, but rather to listen. Listening allows you to comprehend others’ perspectives and also allows you to connect and understand them.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “It’s critical to understand your audience and the purpose of your business. Only when you are truly informed about your business and your clients can you effectively communicate, and that requires communication and research.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “No one gets to the top without a team. Be a team player. I wouldn’t be able to garner press or new business without every single other person at TAIT. It’s important to recognize your strengths and recog- nize the strengths of others. Most important, take time to inspire and be inspired by one another.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Passion about our business is what truly keeps me going on a daily basis. Keep setting goals, take time to appreciate your achievements, and don’t listen to the noise.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “Just as Ms. Tinari does in her own business, we must take the time to talk with our clients, to learn what they like or don’t like about the ways in which we conduct our business, and treat them as customers. Our customers often have strong opinions about how we run our radiology businesses, and we must take the time to talk with them and learn how we can do better.”

    
The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • “That stands in stark contrast to many radiology groups, whose physicians take great interest in the imaging part of their business but don’t take the time to learn about how things are going in other parts of the business (such as marketing, patient relations, nursing, etc). Radiologists are often blind to several very important facets of their own business, and this has the potential to be very dangerous to a practice’s long-term financial health.” 


    The Ability to Multitask Effectively While Ensuring That All Customers Understand That They Are the Priority.
Tinari M, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
J Am Coll Radiol. 2016 Oct;13(10):1279-1280
  • " Social media, including Facebook, Twitter, Blogger, Naver, and Reddit serves as a potential platform through which physicians can expand research efforts, promote health awareness, facilitate patient education, and communicate new research findings and best-practice guidelines. Because social media have become integrated into the lives of the millennial generation, medical educational materials need to be adapted to reach this generation of physicians, who are using it for information distribution and interaction."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • "Facebook is a potentially valuable educational tool for the generation that uses social media because it delivers information directly to users in a way to which they have become accustomed. When a user connects to a Facebook page, that page's posts are delivered to the user's personal page in real time, so that information is communicated directly to the user in a timely fashion, rather than the user having to search for new information."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • "Facebook has been embraced by medical professionals and medical institutions to promote health awareness, develop research projects, facilitate patient and student education, improve consultation and collaboration, increase disease awareness, and describe best-practice guidelines."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • "The millennial generation favors more technologically oriented teaching methods, and web-based
    delivery of information and educational materials will only grow as future physicians are exposed to technology at a young age. The information provided in this article could be valuable to medical educators and those who are in the process of or are considering developing an educational Facebook page."

    New Frontiers in Education: Facebook as a Vehicle for Medical Information Delivery
    Carolina Lugo-Fagundo, Madison B. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas,  Pamela T. Johnson, Elliot K. Fishman
    Journal American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 316 - 319
  • " Radiologists have been unwilling to directly discuss scan results with patients under the assumption that they might not understand what we are telling them. Bill Phillips's lecture has convinced us that our true customers are not other physicians ordering scans but rather the patients undergoing those scans, and,
    going forward, we must be willing to directly interact with those patients and convince them to partake of our radiologic services."
    The Men's Health Special Sauce: Ingredients Revealed
    Bill Phillips, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman,
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 351 - 353
  • "Just as the readership of Men's Health looks to the magazine for direct advice, we believe that patients will want to hear directly from their radiologists about what studies to undergo, the results of their examinations, and recom- mendations for follow-up. People increasingly want to take charge of their own health, and radiology practices willing to help patients do so might end up being more economically successful."

    The Men's Health Special Sauce: Ingredients Revealed
    Bill Phillips, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, MD, Siva P. Raman,
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 351 - 353
  • "Dissatisfaction resulting from usability issues may cause physicians to resist using mobile apps for their education or training. The results of this study may be communicated to vendors to assist in the design of mobile education and training apps by highlighting the areas of difficulty radiologists are currently facing. These results could also inform the research and clinical community as evidence-based guidelines are created to help select mobile apps that will yield maximal educational and clinical benefits."

    Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists' Training in Diagnostic Decision Making
    Kim, Min Soon et al.
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 335 - 343
  • "More than 85% of physicians in the United States use smart phones and 53% use tablets daily in their practice areas. There are four major app stores (iTunes, Google Play, Windows, and BlackBerry), but the majority of apps are offered through the iTunes and Google Play stores. In February 2015, the iTunes App Store contained approximately 32,000 medical mobile apps, whereas Google Play's app store had about 23,000 medical apps. Medical apps fall under many different categories, including reference apps, such as the Physician's Desk Reference app, medical calculators, and apps designed to access electronic health records or personal health information."

    Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists' Training in Diagnostic Decision Making
    Kim, Min Soon et al.
    Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 13 , Issue 3 , 335 - 343
  • Use of Social Media in Medicine/Radiology
    - Education
    - Professional networking
    - Specialty awareness
    - Become a key person of influence
    - Assessing performance
    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “Social media has erased international and hierarchical boundaries thus raising awareness of important international education and research meetings. International radiology societies such as Radiology Society for North America (RSNA), British Institute of Radiology (BIR), Royal College of radiologists (RCR) and the ACR are increasingly embracing usage of social media tools such as Twitter to engage delegates, trainees and international collaborators; this has been shown to improve involvement, cohesion and collaboration amongst delegates. In addition at the international conferences discussions on the lectures and learning points are encouraged on twitter so that delegates and people who were not able to attend can benefit from the ongoing discussions.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “Social media has allowed people with specific interests in certain topics to become key people of influence on this topic by regular postings and involvement in online discussions in this topic area. This provides the environment where newspapers, magazines and TV researchers search for people who can meet journalists to discuss their work. Even an introverted person who finds it difficult in environments with lots of people can exert their knowledge and opinions and can start to direct a specific area within a speciality. It is strongly recommended to promote your research and ongoing learning on your social media so that people interested in your work connect with you and take interest in your work. It is no longer a requirement to be a professor to hold an important role amongst your peers in a certain topic area.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “The RCR in UK endeavors in its 2014-2016 strategy to increase awareness of the radiology awareness as a specialty. These ambitions are similar in other radiology organizations worldwide. The revolution in social media enables radiologists to showcase their roles and responsibilities in the healthcare setting, and provides an interface to engage with patients and other healthcare members. Social media can therefore be a tool to improve patient education; this can be in the form of twitter feeds or health blogs tailored to discuss essential or topical issues in the media or local community. This may increasingly provide valuable self-management insight and disease prevention for patients. In the context of radiology it could give them a better insight into the implications of radiation and how important imaging is to their diagnoses and ongoing management.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “Patients may find reassurance in social media by providing a knowledge library consistent with up to date evidence; a feature of social media, which is extremely beneficial in the management of chronic conditions. Social media also enables the opportunity to provide instant feedback serving as a tool to identify areas of improvement for the future. For patients, social media provides an environment for people with common problems to discuss these making the overall patient journey better with a reduction in the use of vital healthcare resources.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • “In Europe the largest professional social networks are Linkedin and Xing. These create a borderless environment enabling interactions between global healthcare leaders, academics and clinicians. Groups are formed and global discussions on key issues in radiology can take place in real time. Social media also promotes exciting opportunities for innovation through collaboration with other specialties thus improving interdisciplinary relations. Radiologists are able to exchange ideas on an international scale enhancing the understanding of practice and challenges facing the field globally. These professional networks also allow radiologists to search for new training and working opportunities around the world. Furthermore, the social media tool research gate has improved access to open source research and has significantly improved the ease at which collaborations can be formed. In addition clinicians and scientists working on similar projects can share papers, data and ideas without being physically present at conferences.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status? 
Kassamali RH, Palkhi EY, Hoey ET. 
Quant Imaging Med Surg 2015;5(4):491-493
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 1 million — End of 2004.
    - 5.5 million — End of 2005.
    - 12 million — End of 2006.
    - 20 million — April 2007.
    - 50 million — October 2007.
    - 100 million — August 2008.
    - 150 million — January 2009.
    - 175 million — February 2009.
    - 200 million — April 2009.
    - 250 million — July 2009.
    - 300 million — September 2009.
    - 350 million — End of 2009.
    - 400 million — February 2010.
    - 500 million — July 2010.
    - 608 million — End of 2010.
    - 750 million — July 2011.
    - 800 million — September 2011.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
    - 901 million — March 2012.
    - 955 million — June 2012.
    - 1.01 billion — September 2012.
    - 1.06 billion — December 2012.
    - 1.11 billion — March 2013.
    - Source: Facebook Inc.
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 250 million — July 2009.
    - 300 million — September 2009.
    - 350 million — End of 2009.
    - 400 million — February 2010.
    - 500 million — July 2010.
    - 608 million — End of 2010.
    - 750 million — July 2011.
    - 800 million — September 2011.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 750 million — July 2011.
    - 800 million — September 2011.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
    - 901 million — March 2012.
    - 955 million — June 2012.
    - 1.01 billion — September 2012.
    - 1.06 billion — December 2012.
    - 1.11 billion — March 2013.
    - Source: Facebook Inc.
  • Facebook and 1.1 Billion Users Can’t Be Wrong
    - 1 million — End of 2004.
    - 5.5 million — End of 2005.
    - 12 million — End of 2006.
    - 50 million — October 2007.
    - 100 million — August 2008.
    - 150 million — January 2009.
    - 350 million — End of 2009.
    - 608 million — End of 2010.
    - 845 million — End of 2011.
    - 1.06 billion — December 2012.
  •  “The CT Contrast Protocols application for the iPad and iPhone is one of the first radiology applications in the Apple App Store to focus on radiology education and was designed to address the lack of practical information on contrast media for radiologists, technologists, nurses, and trainees.”
     CT Contrast Protocols Application for the iPad: New Resource for Technologists, Nurses, and Radiologists
    Raman SP, Raminpour S, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    RadioGraphics 2013; 33:913-921
  • “The developers of the application thought that providing the user with specific questions and answers could be more practically useful on a day-to-day basis than a larger amount of text or information.”
     CT Contrast Protocols Application for the iPad: New Resource for Technologists, Nurses, and Radiologists
    Raman SP, Raminpour S, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    RadioGraphics 2013; 33:913-921
  •  “ We believe that this application, in addition to its educational value, is a clear illustration of the unlimited possibilities that exist in the mobile sphere, particularly on the iPad and iPhone, for radiology educational resource .”
     CT Contrast Protocols Application for the iPad: New Resource for Technologists, Nurses, and Radiologists
    Raman SP, Raminpour S, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    RadioGraphics 2013; 33:913-921
© 1999-2017 Elliot K. Fishman, MD, FACR. All rights reserved.