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Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning

3D and Workflow: Dealing With the Patient Imaging Pearls - Learning Modules | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ 3D and Workflow ❯ Dealing with the Patient

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  • “The success of gender-diverse teams isn’t true just in companies but also on boards. When there is a higher representation of women on boards, companies have more meetings, have higher attendance rates, experience greater participation in decision making, engage in tougher monitoring, and are more likely to replace CEOs when stock performs poorly.”


    The Cost of Unconscious Bias and Pattern Recognition
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth 
Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 1119 - 1121
  • “When you combine this concept of pattern recognition with the fact that fewer than 6% of people making investment decisions at venture capital firms are women, it’s not surprising that venture capitalists might often overlook female entrepreneurs in their attempt to unearth the “next big thing”.


    The Cost of Unconscious Bias and Pattern Recognition
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth 
.Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 1119 - 1121
  • “With 70% of consumer spending decisions being made by women (and an even higher percentage when it comes to health care decisions) and two-thirds of all the wealth in the United States being controlled by women by 2030, if you don’t have women participating in strategy and product decision making, one could argue that you are leaving money on the table”.


    The Cost of Unconscious Bias and Pattern Recognition
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth 
.Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 1119 - 1121
  • “Although these data and experience are clearly focused on venture capital and business, many of these findings and lessons may apply equally to other sectors, including health care and radiology, where, as in venture capital, pattern recognition may be both the key to success and a significant risk.”


    The Cost of Unconscious Bias and Pattern Recognition
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth 
.Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 1119 - 1121
  • “In terms of diversity, specifically gender diversity, our profession lags significantly behind other medical specialties. A survey by the ACR found that in 2014, women consti- tuted 22% of radiologists, a figure that had not changed significantly since 2007, even though women now account for about half of all medical students. The numbers of women in private practice and at the highest level of radiology leadership are even lower.”


    The Cost of Unconscious Bias and Pattern Recognition
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth 
.Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 1119 - 1121
  • “Creating a radiology workplace that is attractive to women will be a major step forward in the recruitment process. As Ms Abramson states, if we can recruit and retain a more diverse workforce, we will be rewarded with more successful departments with greater ability to realize our full potential.”


    The Cost of Unconscious Bias and Pattern Recognition
Jenny Abramson, Elliot K. Fishman, Karen M. Horton, Sheila Sheth 
.Journal of the American College of Radiology , Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 1119 - 1121
  • “Outcomes trended toward superior survival for MDC vs. non-MDC patients, and almost 30% of patients had a change in diagnosis. Adjusted for home region, MDC patients were more likely retained, suggesting higher patient satisfaction. Total costs per patient were lower for MDC patients, even with higher retention. Outpatient costs were higher for MDC, suggesting that greater outpatient engagement in MDCs supplant more costly inpatient encounters. Because quality is superior with lower costs, these data suggest multidisciplinary models offer higher-value care.”


    Multidisciplinary Oncology Clinics Deliver Higher Value Care.
Elnahal SM, Rosati LM, Moningi S, Hodgin M, Laheru DA, Fishman EK, Weiss MJ, Pawlik TM, Wolfgang CL, Herman JM
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2016 Oct 1;96(2S):S133
  • OBJECTIVE. The objective of the present study is to evaluate patient understanding of radiology and radiologists and to assess patient interest in direct consultation with a radiologist.


    CONCLUSION. The level of comfort with radiologists as image interpreters was statistically significantly higher than the level of comfort with nonradiologist interpreters, and most patients were interested in meeting with radiologists. Educational material improved patient perception and knowledge of radiology. 


    Patient Perception of Radiology and Radiologists: A Survey Analysis of Academic and Community Institutions 
Jdomina JG et al. 
AJR 2016; 207:811–819
  • “A total of 72% of patients (1426/1976) selected a monetary value to express their perceived value of consulting with a radiologist, with 43% of respondents (619/1426) selecting $0, 37% (523/1426) selecting $10–30, and the remaining 20% (284/1426) indicating that they would pay $40 or more (Fig. 3). The dis- tribution of these values was similar, regardless of the institution where the respondents were surveyed. A total of 5% of respondents (72/1426) were willing to pay $75 or more for a 15-minute appointment with a radiologist.”

    Patient Perception of Radiology and Radiologists: A Survey Analysis of Academic and Community Institutions 
Jdomina JG et al. 
AJR 2016; 207:811–819
  • “After receiving educational material, patients were more comfortable with radiologists as their image interpreter and were less comfortable with either untrained or supervised nonradiologists providing similar services. Overall, patients thought that they were more knowledgeable about radiology and radiologists after reading educational 
material, which is a simple way of providing added value to our profession.”


    Patient Perception of Radiology and Radiologists: A Survey Analysis of Academic and Community Institutions 
Jdomina JG et al. 
AJR 2016; 207:811–819
  • Social Media use in Radiology is not a US centric interest
  • “A recently published comprehensive analysis of social media encourages health care staff to embrace the ‘e-society’ and social media revolution as it has shown to provide improved outcomes for healthcare staff and patients.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Rahil H. Kassamali, Ebrahim Y. A. Palkhi, Edward T. Hoey
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “In the current day and age constant assessment of an organization’s or a professional’s performance is judged on reviews from customers. The tourism industry has been completely revolutionised by the forum Tripadvisor. This has now been transformed into the medical world with websites such as iwantgreatcare.co.uk and ratemds.com. Radiologists should be proud of their performance and their role in a patient’s journey and should be active in collecting feedback to display their strengths and learn from areas suggested for improvement. Use of these tools can strengthen a radiologists reputation amongst patients and colleagues.”

    
Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Rahil H. Kassamali, Ebrahim Y. A. Palkhi, Edward T. Hoey
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “From a patient perspective, the increased self-education through social media risks the possibility of becoming unnecessarily or inadequately concerned, due to lack of sufficient knowledge or contradicting information on social media; this can jeopardize patient safety especially if some patients use the social media as a replacement for traditional forms of consultation.”


    Social media in clinical radiology: have you updated your status?
Rahil H. Kassamali, Ebrahim Y. A. Palkhi, Edward T. Hoey
Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2015 Aug; 5(4): 491–493.
  • “The survey results underline the need to increase radiologists' skills in using social media efficiently and safely. There is also a need to create clear guidelines regarding the online and social media presence of radiologists to maximize the potential benefits of engaging with social media.”


    Radiologists' Usage of Social Media: Results of the RANSOM Survey.
Ranschaert ER et al.
J Digit Imaging. 2016 Aug;29(4):443-9.
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Social Media in Radiology

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